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Review in Let it Rock, dmme.net by Dmitry M. Epstein from Ontario, Canada, August 2017 About Reflections

On pastures unplugged, Catalan paragon of percussion ponders upon inner peace.

Maybe it’s a sign of maturity: a logical role from the edgy, electrically driven “Resolution” to this acoustic album which is no less charged on an emotional level. Waving goodbye to fusion and drifting toward refined jazz tropes, Xavi Reija and his new sidekicks – contrabassist Pau Lligadas and piano player Nitai Hershkovits – opt for very nuanced performances now, and if some dynamics get flattened in the process, the ultimate reward is a transfer of well-patterned placidity from the trio to the listener.

Light yet majestic, the baroque-tinctured “Serenity” and the title tracks – two of them, one marked as “Long Trip” – perfectly encapsulate a pastel hue of it all, while it’s “Ausencia” that is the key to the whole picture, to this barely-there shift of sounds. Starting with “Martina” where anxious friskiness transpires from elegiac strokes and ending with the splashes of “Thy Remembrance” for a bittersweet aftertaste to last long, the record has romance painted over every note, blue and otherwise. But if “Capella (We Still Dance)” offers a frivolous surge of rhythm and melody, the piece’s echoes in its non-subtitled, rather a dry namesake and the sprightly “We Keep Walking” create alternately ruminative and exuberant swirls of aural color.

A space for thought, “Reflections” doesn’t mirror the listener’s feeling, though, but there’s a delicately-driven direction for one’s pondering to flow freely, and such guidance is impossible to resist.

Review in All About Jazz by MARK SULLIVAN, march 2017 About Reflections

Spanish drummer Xavier Reija‘s previous trio was a fusion outfit with guitarist Dusan Jevtovic and bass guitarist Bernat Hernandez, as heard on Resolution (MoonJune Records, 2016) and Live at RZZ Barcelona (MoonJune Records, 2016). He turns to a traditional acoustic piano trio here, with pianist Nitai Hershkovits and bassist Pau Lligadas. There’s a different kind of energy in this band, but there is energy aplenty.

That energy is especially audible on a track like “Capella (we still dance),” with its insistent, propulsive rhythm—it really does have a dance feeling, and bassist Lligadas turns in a fine solo. But even when Reija is using brushes, as he does right from the beginning on opener “Martina,” as well as “Childhood Dream” and the ballad “Thy Remembrance,” there is always a firm rhythmic push driving the music forward, often with a double-time feel bubbling under the surface of the music. He does not especially compose like a drummer (whatever that means); in a blindfold test, the natural inclination would be to assume that the pianist is the leader. The drumming isn’t overly busy, it’s just present to a greater than usual extent in a piano trio setting.

Both the paired tracks, “Capella (we still dance)” with closer “Capella” and “Reflections” with “Reflections (long trip)” share a common feel without being variations of each other. The acoustic setting places composing, drumming and band-leading into greater focus (without minimizing the tremendous contributions of his band mates). Anyone thinking of Reija as a fusion drummer will likely be pleasantly surprised. In a landscape littered with piano trio recordings, this one stands out for equal parts of lyricism and a special rhythmic drive.

From Holland Review on yourmusicblog.nl by Peter Cox, may 2017 About Reflections

The previous album from Spanish drummer Xavi Reija was one in which he excelled in jazz and free-form songs. On his new album, he works with New Yorker Nitai Hershkovits on piano and Pau Lligadas on upright bass. And while they both may be young, they already have an impressive curriculum. The result is an album that quite surprised me! And the first hint is that the 11 songs on the disk clock in at just under 40 minutes. Which in comparison to previous output is fairly short.

Now, when you start reading the inside text it reads that this is a recording of dance music. Though definitely not in a regular sense. But when you listen to the CD, it becomes clear that there is a certain lightness on offer here. Restrained elegance as it is so aptly described. While there are still parts that remind us we are dealing with virtuoso players who like to experiment and improvise, there is no denying that these songs speakeasy to (at least) my ears.
So, while a drummer, bassist, and pianist are reasonable Commons in jazz land, this trio have managed to come up with a rather delightful album. Joyous and emotionally charged, living and breathing music performed by authentic musicians.

If anything, this proves that music from the heart always reaches out and touches anyone who will listen. Wonderful album.

From New Jersey review on the gapplegatemusicreview.blogspot.com.es by Grego Edwards About Reflections

From drummer Xavi Reija we have a thoroughly musical outing of himself and his trio (with Nitai Hershkovits on piano and Pau Lligadas on acoustic bass) doing a set of Reija originals. Reflections (self-released) captures contemporary piano trio jazz in exemplary form. The tunes are harmonically rich, changes oriented and both lyrical and driving, depending.

Hershkovits has a style that is out of Corea, post-Jarrett, Hancockian, and beyond to today. It’s up-to-the-minute fresh, with excellent technique and a singing protectiveness. Lligadas keeps the forward momentum grounded in the changes and helps keep that horizontal movement nicely structured. Xavi’s drumming is driving, rhythmically creative, well-conceived and in its own way a very important, critical contribution to the trio’s melodic-propulsive brilliance.
And Xavi writes some very nice tunes that are as fresh as the trio’s realization of them.
The more I play this one, the better it sounds to me. This is a trio that deserves wider exposure. They are firmly in the “art” realm of piano trio creating. Hear this.

Review in All About Jazz by Mathew Aquiline march 2017 About Reflections

Deviating from his reputation within the realm of boundary-pushing progressive rock/jazz fusion, Catalan drummer and composer Xavi Reija removed the presence of electrified instruments that dominated previous works for an acoustic album that explores the jazz piano trio format. Reflections, his eighth recording as a leader, synthesizes Reija’s dynamic authority behind the kit with the lyrical proficiency of bassist Pau Lligadas and the great pianist Nitai Hershkovits (best known for his work with bassist Avishai Cohen). What results is a set of expressive compositions that foster conversational interplay propelled by an attention to rhythmic detail.

Throughout, Reija embodies the adaptability required of a session leader who happens to be a drummer; he perpetuates the equilibrium between subtlety and flashiness, applying both accordingly to assure the ultimate goal of collaborative music. On the album’s opener “Martina,” Reija exhibits the aforementioned notion with an understated brush pattern that tastefully underpins an airy piano melody—driving the music rather than overwhelming. By contrast, the elaborate hi-hat strikes in 7/4 during the outset of “Capella (We Still Dance)” gives way to dexterous playing that gloriously escalates in effervescence.

The most remarkable feature of this album is the inexhaustible torrent of emotion that surges with each passing composition. A certain song’s spectrum of feeling is often hinted with its title, but ultimately discerned through evocative playing that brims with passion. “Childhood Dream” elicits the keen sense of nostalgia and innocence you would expect from its title, emphasizing an exultant melody that unfurls from a wash of cymbals. A standout track, Hershkovits’ stately phrasing initiates a pervading aura of pensiveness accentuated through sensitive bass runs and brushwork during the dirgelike ballad “Ausencia.” Subsequently, Reija’s fluid beat that stresses cross sticking spurs an equally as musing performance on the fittingly titled “Serenity.”

As ruminative and introspective as this album is at times, there is still an abundance of moments that cut through with striking potency. “We Keep Walking” is affixed to a thundering groove early on that only becomes more pronounced through prancing snare hits and a spirited piano ostinato. Furthermore, the unpredictable trajectory of “Letter From The Aegean” commences with a sinuous melody that precipitates a lithe piano solo before the brooding timbre of struck tom-toms eclipses any remaining trace of delicateness.

Reflections is a dynamic, imaginative set for a mainly jazz-rock-oriented drummer’s foray into the intimate musical environment that is the jazz trio. The short, concise pieces are ideal in showcasing Reija’s finesse as an accompanist and leader, and advance his overall prowess as a composer. If you prefer your piano trio with a little extra rhythmic kick, look no further.

Track Listing: Martina; Reflections (Long Trip); Capella (We Still Dance); Childhood Dream; Reflections; Ausencia; We Keep Walking; Letter From The Aegean; Serenity; Capella; Thy Remembrance.

Review on autopoietican.blogspot by Cesar Inca Mendoza de Loyola in Perú, June 2017 About Reflections

HOLA, AMIGOS DE AUTOPOIETICAN, LES SALUDA CÉSAR INCA.

Hoy nos metemos en el mundo musical del híper-talentoso baterista y compositor catalán XAVI REIJA… y lo hacemos un poco tardíamente, valgan verdades. Es una pena que no nos hayamos dado abasto antes para abrir un espacio a las más recientes novedades de XAVI REIJA en este blog, pero bueno, más vale tarde que nunca. hoy  es el día para centrar nuestros oídos y nuestras mentes en su disco publicado en línea durante la segunda mitad del pasado año 2016, el cual se titula “Reflections”. Estructurado en torno al formato de trío que se completa con el pianista Nitai Hershkovits y el contrabajista Pau Lligadas, REIJA da rienda suelta a las aristas más introspectivas de su ecléctico cosmos jazzero contemporáneo. Claro está, cada una de estas aristas cuenta en sí misma con una versatilidad propia a la cual el trío deja explayarse dentro de un encuadre bien definido: así, la combinación dialéctica de libertad de expresión y claridad conceptual da bellísimos resultados a lo largo del repertorio de “Reflections”. Las jornadas de grabación para este material tuvieron lugar en sesiones sueltas de junio y julio del 2016, en el 44.1 Studio de Girona, para que en los siguientes meses de agosto y setiembre se realizaran las correspondientes labores de producción y masterización en el estudio Impact Mastering Lab.

‘Martina’ inicia el repertorio marcando un estupendo candor melódico, arrebatador pero sujeto a un refinamiento que exige mesura a la conmovedora reflexividad que inspira al motif. Los elegantes efluvios del piano son bien sustentados por la meticulosa dupla rítmica: algo que resulta más que suficiente para atrapar nuestra atención desde el punto de partida. A continuación sigue la pieza homónima, la cual está iluminada por un aura de exquisita sobriedad que no logra y no quiere ocultar el impacto emotivo inherente a su desarrollo temático central. En todo caso, el solo de contrabajo que emerge en alguna instancia del camino resulta crucial a la hora de realzar la susodicha sobriedad general de la pieza. ‘Capella (We Still Dance)’ cumple con la misión de abrirse a campos de expresividad extrovertida sobre un compás particularmente complejo: aires latinos se hacen notar en la estructuración de la amalgama instrumental en curso, los mismos que garantizan la persistencia de una luminosidad cautivadora. El cuarto tema se titula ‘Reflections (Long Trip)’ y su misión es la de revisar el cuerpo central de la pieza homónima con un groove más animado inspirado en el Latin jazz de raigambre bossa novero, siendo así que esta actitud más animada se perpetúa acto seguido con la emergencia de ‘Childhood Dream’, pieza que nos muestra otro genial ejemplo de la habilidad del trío para gestar un ambiente de jolgorio musical sobre un compás sofisticado y con un señorial empleo de la improvisación dentro de un lenguaje metódicamente respetuoso de la melodía en curso. Podríamos aventurarnos a adelantar que en esta última tríada disponemos de un estupendo cénit para el repertorio del álbum, pero lo que aún queda por escuchar no es nada desdeñable en lo absoluto. En efecto, la bella pieza ‘Ausencia’ surge para obsequiarnos un conmovedor paisaje sonoro de la melancolía en un espacio de poco menos de 5 minutos. Las líneas melódicas y variaciones correspondientes del piano brillan a su antojo.

Abre la segunda mitad del álbum ‘We Keep Walking’ y lo hace impulsando un espléndido híbrido de la claridad melódica de las dos primeras piezas del álbum con la extroversión mágica que signó a las tres piezas que siguieron después. La aureola de magnificencia intelectual y espiritual se hace patente en cada compás y cada nota empleados en este tema que instaura otro cénit creativo dentro del repertorio. En este estimulante zigzag evocativo que estamos disfrutando llega la hora para otro momento de introspección, y éste llega de la mano de ‘Thy Remembrance’, mientras que poco después, ‘Serenity’ honra sabiamente a su propio título con una placidez que se siente genuinamente poderosa a despecho de su patente autoconstricción. En medio de estas dos excelentes muestras de distinguida apacibilidad, ‘Letter From The Aegean’ se explaya en un exultante jolgorio sonoro donde el solaz es el rey ingeniero que dirige la vitalidad vigente. También tenemos un retorno del motif central de ‘Capella’ para el tema que se titula simplemente así, el cual reconstruye con una algarabía nueva el espíritu lúdico que se nos mostró en el tercer tema del repertorio. Cabe señalar que ‘Thy Remembrance’ cierra el repertorio seleccionado para la versión física de “Reflections”, pero en lo que concierne al repertorio virtual disponible en la página web de REIJA todavía tenemos unas cuantas piezas más: ‘Something More For You’, un tema no muy extenso que se centra en un jam vivazmente sustentado sobre un compás complejo, algo muy útil para realzar la gracilidad reinante; ‘Lost In Thought’, que es un jam construido en base al diálogo alegre entre la batería y el contrabajo, siendo así que el piano cumple con la función de aportar un colorido mesurado al asunto.

Tal como admitimos en nuestra autoinculpación del primer párrafo de la presente reseña, ésta es bastante tardía, pero el mensaje de fondo es que “Reflections” es un disco bellísimo cuya máxima fortaleza está en las sutilezas y gráciles auras sonoras que predominan tanto en la articulación de las composiciones básicas como en las interacciones performativas de los músicos involucrados. XAVI REIJA es un personaje destacado dentro de la avanzada jazzera europea del momento y merece que le sigamos la pista a cada momento. Solo valen elogios para lo concerniente a “Reflections”.

 

Muestras de “Reflections”.-

We Keep Walking: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1Toe5cB–I

Reflections (Long Trip): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiHbq4acuNQ

Reseña en progresivacineollas.blogspot.com.es Sobre Reflections

El eclecticismo es una cualidad que define a la creación progresiva, quizá la que le confiere el mayor vuelo ya que involucra distintos elementos amalgamando tendencias y formas para lograr el resultado deseado, colorida y de definiciones surrealistas en el arte plástico, y en lo referente a la música de una sonoridad que también se asocia al color y la forma en la imaginación de la mente melómana, como tal entonces me gusta acompañar en este blog ese lado ecléctico del músico creador con la investigación y divulgación de estas obras tan particulares, por ello esta entrada está dedicada a un brillante músico catalán, Xavi Reija, baterista, compositor y escritor de libros técnicos, que tiene una amplia trayectoria didáctica y profesional dentro del jazz de fusiones progresivas contando con tres discos editados dentro del estilo, y su último editado en el año 2016, “Reflections”, que es al que me voy a referir.

“Reflections” es una obra para cuya realización sumó a dos músicos profesionales conformando un trío compuesto por Nitai Hershkovits en piano, Pau Lligadas en bajo y lógicamente Xavi Reija en batería, producción y composición, con la participación de los tres músicos en los arreglos. Consta de temas relativamente cortos acomodados en un orden armonioso, motivados cada uno en su concepto derivado de los distintos sentimientos humanos, dentro de un clima de jazz sobrio, intimista, fresco y cálido que va directo al corazón, logrando a través de los tres instrumentos una nivelación de las químicas en la integración de la homogeneidad sonora, siendo el piano el protagonista destacado al momento de remontar las melodías, el bajo aportando la sólida base rítmica o brillando discretamente al momento de los solos fraseados y la batería que en momentos es etérea y sutil, y en otros ajusta las energías exactas en los tramos que las requieren.

Hay variadas atmósferas en cada uno de los temas, de acuerdo con su temática según lo previamente comentado, el que da título a la obra, “Reflections” que consta de dos tramos, contiene una bella melodía en piano, melancólica, aportando buena variante con el solo en bajo. El swing totalmente presente en dos tramos, “Capella” y el graciosamente infantil de “Childhood dream”, la profunda nostalgia se transmite desde los teclados rodeados de la base etérea de “Ausencia”. La energía contagia el ritmo de “We keep walking”, contrastando el delicado piano que acompaña al fraseo del bajo en la suave melodía de “Thy remembrance”, igualmente a “Serenity” en un tramo delicado con una dinámica en bases que crece y diluye en sus distintas instancias, diferenciándose con el ágil “Letter form de Aegean” de potente base rítmica, parte todos ellos de un total de once temas que conforman este maravilloso disco, sin duda entre mis favoritos.

Review en la web Distritojazz.com por I.Ortega Sobre Reflections

Notable cambio estilístico y de registro el que supone para el batería catalán Xavi Reija este ‘Reflections’.

Tras sus inicios con el ‘Electric Quintet’ y sus trabajos junto al guitarrista Dusan Jevtovic del 2013 y 2015 ahora nos aparece con este trio acústico completamente diferente.

‘Reflections’ parece marcar el inicio de una nueva etapa mas madura en la carrera de Xavi que para ello se ha rodeado del contrabajista Pau Igadas y del pianista israelita Nitai Hershkovits, vaya amor por los compañeros con apellidos difíciles, un colaborador habitual del conocido contrabajista Avishai Cohen.

En esta grabación Xavi vuelve a demostrarnos sus calidades como compositor aportando todos los temas de lo que el llama musica de baile, no en el sentido literal de lo que normalmente entendemos, sino como intercambio alegre entre tres musicos que disfrutan con lo que hacen y buscan compartirlo con los demás.

Creo que al final lo consiguen, ya sea por el nervio siempre presente de un batería como Xavi que sabe buscar su sitio y apoyar el trabajo del imaginativo y lírico Nitai y, por que no decirlo, la sólida presencia de un Pau Igadas recio en su labor como contrabajista.

Los once temas de este ‘Reflections’ reúnen muchos de los sentimientos que puedes albergar a lo largo de una vida. Asi lo da a entender el propio Xavi en el interior del disco.

Honestidad, contemplación, reflexión, tristeza, pérdida, alegría o simple amistad cuando hace falta todo esta reflejado en este disco. Nada sobra en esta grabación que supone un agradable descubrimiento para los que seguíamos la carrera de este baterista.

Poco sabíamos de esta faceta mas reposada y madura que no desmerece para nada la anterior y que confió tenga un buen recibimiento entre los que ya le conocían y suponga un acercamiento a nuevos públicos para el futuro.

Review by Dmitry M. Epstein (http://dmme.net) from Ontario, Canada About Live at RZZ (Xavi Reija Electric Trio

Taking it to the limit that’s not there, theater of rhythm creates an imitation of life.

It’s often a drummer thing to drive controversy as a means of contrast, and Xavi Reija is a master of this art. 2014’s “Resolution” had a deliciously raw edge to it, but on-stage its material – delivered around the time of the record’s release – acquires unexpected gloss, so this document can be seen as that album’s alternative amalgam. It’s an intense, trance-like experience drawn between “Dreamer” and “Dreamland” – a piece from the artist’s past which matches his new repertoire’s context – where grooves range from disco delirium to freaky fusion, as Bernat Hernandez’s bass and Dusan Jevtovic’s guitar rage and caress the beats in equal measure.

There’s relentless, crazy-blues buzz in “Unfinished Love” contrasting the lively elegy of “Shadow Dance” yet “Abyss” distils emotions to a march of sorts, and “John’s Song” resolves into a motorik rally in front of the audience. In the moment, “Flying To Nowhere” is turned into a shimmering nightmare possessed of weird romantic magnetism, while “Macroscope” is bent into smoldering, meandering funk wig out where cymbals shuffle to lock into snare action. All but static, this performance is a great snapshot of Reija and his compadres in their element.

Review by Félix Amador on the http://jazzeseruido.blogspot.com.es/ About Reflections

Baterista, compositor, educador, Xavi Reija presenta estos días su octavo trabajo y sorprende que nos resulte tan desconocido un nombre con tantos y tan interesantes discos a sus espaldas. Después de explorar con quinteto e incluso con trío eléctrico, en Reflections, su nuevo álbum, nos regala once temas con un estilo uniforme y coherente que explora las posibilidades del trío de jazz moderno.
Atendiendo a las notas del CD, este es un disco de música de baile. Bien, no lo que uno esperaría como música de baile, pero lo cierto es que el trío de piano es, en realidad, una sección de ritmo puro, y el baile no es otra cosa sino ritmo. En este sentido, sorprende la sensibilidad con que la mayoría de los temas, incluso llevando un compás que es teóricamente bailable, muestra un jazz reflexivo, lírico, con un Reija capaz de demostrar que con escobillas o con los toms se puede hacer una música delicada y alejada de (lo que algunos amigos profanos llaman) el estruendo del jazz.
En este sentido, las composiciones se desarrollan a partir de delicadas melodías que incitan a la contemplación, con un sólido y colorido Nitai Hershkovits al piano, y en las que incluso el contrabajo (Pau Lligadas) se muestra lírico y delicado, casi cantabile. Pero también hay momentos de gran intensidad contenida (el final de “Reflections”, con esos platos obsesivos) o al límite, como en “Capella (we still dance)”, donde el trío muestra un trasfondo funk sin perder la esencia reflexiva del disco.
Es difícil encontrar un batería que, como Xavi Reija, busque emociones en la percusión. Los recursos que usa, en especial la manera en que frasea con los platos y el charles, muestran que no sólo intenta crear un colchón rítmico como hacen otros percusionistas sino forzar un diálogo intenso, un diálogo que dota a este trío de una energía expresiva muy original, aunque en la mayoría de los temas esta energía se exprese en voz baja. Dan Burke lo expresa así en el libreto del disco:

El objetivo clave de estas composiciones parece ser expresar honesta (y humanamente) esperanza y ambición, contemplación y reflexión, tristeza y pérdida, y el simple disfrute del amor y la compañía.

Hay que decir que todos los temas (menos uno) son breves, efectivos disparos de 3 minutos y poco, con melodías e improvisaciones que van al grano, y, por destacar algún tema, destacar “Ausencia”, que comienza con unas frases especulativas de Hershkovits durante un minuto largo. Los platos crash marcan el cambio y las escobillas aparecen para sostener el tema con delicadeza y fuerza. El bajo, contenido, permite al piano elaborar frases muy líricas, inspiradas pero sin florituras, bellísimas. Todo un temazo. También es muy interesante el solo de contrabajo de “Thy Remembrance”, al que sigue una especie de diálogo donde cantan a dúo bajo y piano, mientras que la batería parece sostener el tema como lo haría un piano de acompañamiento. La coda del álbum, “Capella” es también un tema brillante, rítmico, cantable y, por supuesto, bailable.
Como hemos citado más arriba, Xavi Reija es, además de músico y compositor, docente, y su álbum Reflections se puede comprar en su web (también) en partituras y en vídeo play along para bajo o batería, para músicos y estudiantes que desean disfrutar del disco tocando al mismo tiempo o como material de estudio, algo poco usual.

Dan Burke, New Jersey, E.U.A. About Reflections

First and foremost, this is a recording of dance music, though definitely not in the way one would normally think of that genre. Rather, this is a joyous and emotionally charged exchange between three gifted musicians whose creation lives at the heart of what makes dancing so special – and that is the ability to surrender to both the vulnerability of emotion and the vitality of rhythm.

There is a restrained elegance at work here. Paired with musically simpatico pianist Nitai Hershkovits and bassist Pau Lligada, Xavi Reija’s new jazz trio channels strong and varied emotive content throughout the eleven compact (mostly under four minute) tracks on “Reflections”. Explore the 10th track “Serenity” and you will see what I mean; the slow breathing rhythmic structure serves as safe haven for Nitai to convey the namesake serenity which, when combined with the eggshell fragility of his phrasing, note selection, and song duration, serve to make this one of the most beautiful, and human, compositions I’ve heard in years.

With the playful feel of late 70’s Zawinul, or a more recent Tigran composition, “Martina” opens the album. The beautiful piano melody drifts atop the slippery rhythm section in a measured dance between the two before developing into a conversation. “Reflections ” and “Reflections (Long Trip)” both possess an introspective quality through a combined use of relaxed tempo, spare piano phrasings and Pau’s emotive almost scat-like bass playing . A bubbling stream of rolling watery piano and intricate hihat in 7/4 introduce “Capella (We Still Dance)”, whose hesitant and stuttering piano melody works against the playful dancing drums and bass to create a joyful sense of celebration and almost joyous abandon.

With a wash of cymbals over piano, the appropriately named “Childhood’s Dream” opens (and closes) like a book of memories. Conveyed within this brief time capsule is, at first, a sense of looking forward with youthful wonderment and yearning for things as yet unknown. As the song develops and matures in strength and confidence, there is a sense of looking back at the life lived thus far and the remainder of the journey that still lies ahead. “Ausencia”, the longest track on the record, begins with a spatially relaxed solo piano prequel coaxing out the melodic structure of the tune. After just over one minute, Xavi’s breathy brushwork and the thoughtful bass notes of Pau Lligadas come in to reinforce and further develop the main theme into one truly memorable experience. “We Keep Walking” begins with piano, soon joined by cymbals, bass and then eventually a skipping and subdued yet funky dancing snare. The song gets going with single notes over stabbed fragmented chords, until it finds its way into one glorious mother of a riff that would do Robert Glasper proud. Walking surely gives way to dancing with arms outstretched as this song explodes into a joy that can barely be contained. Contrasted against this, “Thy Remembrance” expresses at first a bittersweet melody of loss with the bass calling out in an almost human voice. As the song develops, the piano offers light, hope and grace for the future. “Letter From the Aegean” comes on strong with a great walking bassline and a more rhythmically straight ahead jazz approach. The pianowork on this track just sings, and the interplay with Xavi’s musical approach to tom work, is magical. “Capella” possesses the single strongest “modern jazz trio” vibe and is a great closing track in the way it showcases the players’ musical skills and comping to great effect. The key goal of these compositions seems to me to honestly (and humanly) express hope and aspiration, contemplation and reflection, sadness and loss, and the simple joy of love and companionship. Nitai, Pau and Xavi really bring an honest emotional intensity to this most personal (and danceable) of recordings. And, to quote Saint Max Roach, when it comes to Xavi’s feel for the kit and his ability to organically interact with the other players, ‘the drum also waltzes’.

New review from Germany-Betreutes Proggen by Philipp Roettgers about XADU About XADU

(56:17, CD, Moonjune / Cargo, 2015)
“Random Abstract” is the debut album released in 2015 by the instrumental band XaDu, a project by Xavi Reija (drums) and Dušan Jevtović (guitar), which makes the initially somewhat strange band name suddenly meaningful. The two have already played in numerous projects and are now devoting themselves to their two-man combo. Only with guitar and drums do they create a “big” sound and do not boredom. Especially the guitar: Jevtović plays clean, sometimes he distorts with countless effects, sometimes he makes a hard rock, sometimes jazz – the whole always atmospheric.

Reija supports him congenially and exciting. The talent of the two influences their musical duels, one almost never misses the rest of a band. Even if you could imagine that “only” two musicians could sometimes sound dull or not full enough: this is not so “Random Abstract”.

Most of the songs begin with a main melody, which is then dismembered and always differently blurred, as is often heard in jazz. Especially the apparently improvised passages stand out positively. Jevtović is able to replace a number of fellow musicians with his guitar loops. Also the Songtitel are always chosen appropriately: ‘Decaying Sky’, ‘New Pop’, ‘Deep Ocean’ and ‘New Hope’ are only a few self-explanatory examples.

Everything seems spontaneous, jazzy, and if you want to look at the progright, perhaps most likely Prog-fusion-like. It seems as if you listened to the two musicians live, rather than a studio recording. It remains to be seen whether the concept will continue to work on other albums or become boring. Until now it is full!

Black Dahlia, Buenos Aires, Argentina About Reflections

Xavi Reija, músico, baterista y compositor catalán, creador de música en un estilo de fusiones de jazz-rock con variantes eclécticas, esta última característica permite la liberación de los rótulos limitantes, tal es así que ha editado un hermoso álbum de jazz de carácter intimista y emocional, “Reflections”, una obra que para la realización de la misma sumó a dos músicos profesionales para la conformación de un maravilloso trío compuesto por Nitai Hershkovits en piano, Pau Lligadas en bajo y lógicamente Xavi Reija en batería, producción y composición, con la participación de los tres músicos en los arreglos.

La obra consta de temas relativamente cortos acomodados en un orden armonioso, motivados cada uno en su concepto en los distintos sentimientos humanos, dentro de un clima de jazz sobrio y cálido que va directo al corazón, logrando a través de los tres instrumentos una nivelación de las químicas en la integración de la homogeneidad sonora, siendo el piano el protagonista destacado al momento de remontar las melodías, el bajo aportando la sólida base rítmica o brillando discretamente al momento de los solos fraseados y la batería que en momentos es etérea y sutil, y en otros ajusta las energías exactas en los tramos que las requieren.

Las atmósferas de los temas son distintas de acuerdo a la temática de cada uno, encontramos como ejemplos, en “Reflections” -en sus dos tramos- la melodía en el piano, bellamente melancólica aportando la variante con el solo del bajo, el swing en las dos formas sonoras de “Capella”, el gracioso ritmo infantil en “Childhood dream”, la lenta y hermosa nostalgia que transmiten los teclados dentro de una base etérea a la que transporta el profundo sentir de “Ausencia”, la contagiante rítmica del jazz en la energía de “We keep walking”, el cepillado rítmico que arrastra a un piano delicadamente melancólico acompañado del fraseo del bajo en la suave melodía de ”Thy remembrance”, o “Serenity”, igualmente sereno y delicado con una dinámica en bases y melodía que crece y despliega energía para luego diluirla hasta el redondeo final, contrastando con el ágil tramo de potente base rítmica de “Letter from de Aegean”.

El hermoso artwork de portada es una foto de una composición acorde con el contenido sonoro de la obra realizada por Joan Abella Escuer, una imagen de difusas luces y sombras jugando con la lluvia que completa la armonización integral de la obra.

Ian Patterson, Allabout jazz

Catalan drummer Xavi Reija’s fifth recording and his first with MoonJune Records is a highly charged affair that draws from rock, jazz and the shifting ground between. Reija’s hard-edged polyrhythms, bassist Bernat Hernandez’ thundering bass lines and guitarist Dusan Jevtovic’s raw, fuzz-toned electric guitar combine to stir up a storm that evokes memories of drummer Tony Williams’ Lifetime and mid-seventies King Crimson.

That, however, is only half the story, for a meditative, slow-burning quality reigns at times while ambient loops and effects lend a psychedelic hue to music that waxes and wanes.Reija and Jetovic’s collaboration goes back a decade in the drummer’s electric quintet, which Hernandez has also been a member of since Ritual (Indi Records, 2008) so it’s no surprise that the trio here is so tight and yet also plays with unabashed freedom.

A generous hour and fifteen minutes is divided between longer tracks—weighing in around the ten-minute mark—of coiled tension and explosive release and shorter, punchier fare that goes straight for the jugula. Reija’s balladic sensibility comes forth on the lovely, brushes-led “Land of the Sirenians”—the most overtly jazz-influenced track and an island of repose in the middle of all the cut and thrust.The trio lays down an impressive marker on the opening track, “Flying to Nowhere”; a strong melodic head introduces a ruminative passage, which simmers slowly before erupting into flowing interplay, returning full circle to the opening motif with Reija on hand percussion.

Hernandez swings between the fluid melodicism of bassist Gary Willis and the more visceral rock aesthetic of former Crimson bassist John Wetton. His bubbling bass funk on “Macroscope” has shades of Weather Report, though the noise-cum-feedback mid-section and the scratchy guitar psychadelia of the finale—beneath propulsive drumming—highlight the trio’s modern, urbane underbelly.An underlying lyricism pervades the music, even at its rawest, and greater emphasis is placed on textures than exhibitionism.

There are flashes of the distorted, flaming guitar improvisations that peppered Jevtovic’s excellent Am I walking Wrong? (MoonJune Records, 2013), for example on the slower, highly melodic “Shadow Dance” and on the rocking “John’s Song,” but in the main the guitarist applies broad, impressionistic strokes on the canvas in the form of drone-like sustain, coruscating fuzzy feedback and loop-filtered effects, as on the powerful avant-rocker “Dreamer,” or light, jazzy lines on the groove-heavy “Gravity.” He also deals in some terrifically nasty power chords and greasy riffs on the dub-rock scorcher “Abyss.”Fans of guitar-driven Indie rock will lap up the pulsating “Unfinished Love,” which features nimble drum work and the brooding rhythms of the bass-heavy “John’s Song.” Both those tracks veer temporarily into ambient territory, whereas longer compositions like “Resolution” and the noodling, somewhat fractured “Welcome to the End” are largely structured around ambient-groove explorations that eschew exclamative dynamics.

Resolution‘s strengths lie in Reija’s ability to fuse raw power and lyricism, dissonance and melody. The playing is first rate throughout and one comes away wondering just how much more powerful this music would surely be on stage. Whether it’s avant-jazz or alt-rock hardly matters. What does matter is that this absorbing performance signals the arrival of a sophisticated power trio like few others.

New review in http://www.backgroundmagazine.nl by Pedro Bekkers

Xavi Reija is another discovery of Moonjune Record’s Leonardo Pavkovic, who seems to have a special sense when it comes to extraordinary musicians. For his latest release; Reija, the Barcelona based drummer, chose to work as a power trio, just concentrating on drums, bass and guitar. So, besides the bandleader himself on drums, fellow Spaniard Bernat Hernandez was asked to fulfill bass duties. On the guitar we find Serbian musician Dusan Jevtovic, who has made Spain his place of residence for the last years. This innovative guitarist also released a solo album on the Moonjune label, called Am I Walking Wrong last year.

Xavi Rejia’s musical style is based on a form of progressive art rock, mixed with free jazz and improvisation. As an extra you get a guitarist who doesn’t feel limited by scales, but purely thinks in sounds. Therefore, this album needs several spins to dig in. Most of the compositions have an adventurous, but solid foundation, laid down by the drums and bass. Using polyrhythmic and percussive drumming, the composition’s basics are quite impressive and the bass can be defined as the instrument that provides the swinging grooves. Over this strong base, Dusan plays his parts; sometimes just a melody that can move on into an effects drenched soundscape like you can hear on Flying To Nowhere. During this composition, you might think something is wrong with the CD or your CD-player, but the guitar has this mean, overdriven sound intentionally. A sample for the fantastic groove that has been laid down, can be heard in Macroscope, a composition that has the same vibe as do Norwegian trumpeter Nils Petter Molvær‘s compositions. As a contrast to “free” compositions like Dreamer and Abyss where chaos seems to go hand in hand with innovative brilliancy, is the following composition; The Land Of The Sirenians. This song sticks to patterns as usually used in jazz and fusion. Here the bass gets the attention it deserves and it might end up as the most accessible composition on the album. After this melodic interlude, the guitar and its effects return to the “red zone“ when it comes to recording. Unfinished Love and John’s Song are once more built on impressive rhythms and feedback-filled solos. The title track Resolution as well as Gravity combine the free style of the previous songs with more structured melodies, which means fewer sounds and more accessible patterns…and again, a fabulous bass. The final track Welcome To The End, has a perfect sounding drum groove. Add the fine bass and soundscape guitar to the mix and a wonderful song is born. For a drummer, this might be a good sample for a super beat.

I think Xavi Reija perfectly keeps the chaos in order on this very impressive CD. You have to take your time to let the music do its work, but when the music settles in your brain, I know you will appreciate the project. People who like music in the style of Nils Petter Molvær, King Crimson‘s Robert Fripp and like a challenge, please try this one, it’s worth it.

New review in http://www.xtm.it by Giuseppe Celano

Drummer Catalan Xavi Reija, accompanied by Dusan Jevtovic (our old friend) and Bernat Hernandez, who was also already known within the rock jazz, is produced in eleven compositions for trio, starting from jazz, rock lapping territories to arrive later towards post-rock sound.
Polyrhythms clenched teeth, scratchy guitars and solos in dissonance are the calling card exhibited dall’opener Flying To Nowhere. So show muscles, uttering the word aloud to put the record straight right now. No room for doubt, here you play jazz contaminated whose propulsion power is rock at its most spartan.
The connivance include funk soul, fueled by the skilled bass notes on the keyboard which run fast fingers of Bernat. While the guitar produces spectral agreements in the distance, buried deep in the mix, the bullies backbeat Xavi show firepower in Macroscope, true titan of the disc. The trend of incisive Dreamer is another absolute highlight of Resolution, the vulgar show of force (as would like to say to the Panther) is the modus operandi of quest’ossuto combo that dare to define (jazz) power trio.
Music contaminant, rifferama polished, skins stretched and low gruff give a hard time to listeners tune in this work. The Land Of Sirenians could be a perfect soundtrack for a movie ambiguous and lascivious, those morbid to which we have always used the cousins across the Alps. Amidst all this Dusan articulated phrasing asphyxiating, direct and fast, coated with a substance stinging ear and indigestible for the stomach of one who is not accustomed to certain sounds acidic.
The distorted bass from the wah-wah gives a strange effect on John’s Song, epileptic eighth track that leads us to the grand finale. We can not reveal all the secrets of “Resolution”, we can tell you however that would be a crime to miss it.

Crítica del disco de XaDu - 'Random Abstract' (2015) | Portal Esquizofrenia, Rock progresivo en espa

XaDu es el resultado de la asociación de dos genios del jazz-rock contemporáneo: el baterista catalán Xavi Reija y el guitarrista serbio Dušan Jevtović (afincado en Cataluña). El producto fonográfico de esta asociación se titula “Random Abstract” y llega a nosotros por vía del sello MoonJune Records (responsable también de publicar trabajos solistas de ambos). La estrategia de Reija y Jevtović es la de sacar provecho de la parca arquitectura sónica propia del formato de dúo para focalizarse en crear texturas y atmósferas, dando vueltas en torno a ellas y generando variantes de turno a fin de dar vida a las ideas musicales que se suceden a lo largo del repertorio del álbum. Usando recursos de la psicodelia, el postrock y, el dúo gesta un esquema sonoro jazz-progresivo que sabe instaurar su propia luminiscencia a contrapelo del rigorismo espartano que predomina en la germinación de las ideas musicales que se van sucediendo. Repasemos ahora los detalles de este disco grabado en dos sesiones separadas que tuvieron lugar en los estudios La Casa Murada de Barcelona, mayo del 2014 y febrero del 2015, respectivamente. El disco vio la luz del día el 20 de abril: el repertorio del mismo fue compuesto equitativamente por los dos integrantes del dúo, creando Reija las tres primeras pieza y la sexta mientras que Jevtović creó otras cuatro, siendo la octava (‘Workplace’) una creación conjunta.

Durando poco más de 6 ó minutos, ‘Secrets’ abre el álbum con un sobrio aire de sigilosa auto-constricción desde el que el dúo trabaja con un motivo sencillo reiterado con sutil ingenio; con la creación de un crescendo en el clímax intermedio, el dúo concreta una parcial resolución del empuje expresivo que, por lo general, queda ingeniosamente sublimado. Luego sigue la pieza homónima, la cual vira hacia una expresividad robusta que echa raíces simultáneas en la tradición space-rockera y en el paradigma Crimsoniano, logrando activar un electrizante jam generosamente alimentado de vibraciones abstractas. ‘Decaying Sky’ ocupa un espacio de casi 8 minutos y lo hace trabajando el dinamismo especial del tempo de 7/8; en este contexto, el dúo trabaja una expresividad más patente y exultante que nos hace evocar por igual la magia luminosa de un HOLDSWORTH y la ingeniería serenamente autoafirmativa de un WINGFIELD. Mención especial merecen las exhibiciones de sofisticación estructural en los grooves que crea Reija desde su asiento de baterista. ‘New Pop’ es la primera composición de Jevtović con la que nos topamos: en base a un esquema de tendencia jazzpop, el dúo se embarca en un ejercicio de llamativa gracilidad que no niega espacios a la inclusión de recursos psicodélicos y despliegues de vigor rockero. Con el tipo de cénit que se había implantado a lo largo de la secuencia de ‘Random Abstract’ y ‘Decaying Sky’, la actitud de ‘New Pop’ conlleva una interesante variación para la persistente extroversión. Cuando llega el turno de ‘Something In Between’, el ensamble se dispone a explorar áreas de misterio y densidad donde se da rienda suelta a los juegos de contrastes multi-temáticos propios del género progresivo e interacciones osadas que coquetean abiertamente con el legado de la avanzada jazzera de los 60s y 70s. Si alguna vez alguien imaginaba cómo sonaría un híbrido entre el KING CRIMSON de la etapa 73-74, el primer MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA y MASSACRE, pues esta pieza es la mágica respuesta a esa hipótesis melómana.

Con ‘Deep Ocean’, el dúo explora más a fondo la densidad dominante en el tema anterior y la lleva hacia un universo sónico de arrolladores inquietudes y tensas dinámicas: una vez más brota el factor Crimsoniano en la armazón general de la pieza, pero esta vez con una oscuridad apabullante que se acerca sugerentemente al paradigma del rock-in-opposition de PRESENT así como a las aventuras lisérgicas del krautrock guitarracéntrico.

La secuencia de los tres últimos temas, ‘Place With A View’, ‘Workplace’ y ‘No Hope’, completa la atmósfera general del álbum con solvente creatividad. ‘Place With A View’ porta el encanto de un ensueño que flota en el inconsciente en medio de extraños aromas relajantes, mientras que ‘Workplace’ se mete de lleno en la vivacidad incandescente de unas vibraciones jazz-rockeras donde la fuerza de carácter se viste con prendas finísimas. En fin, ‘No Hope’ cierra el telón con un aura post-rockera que aparenta ser amable inicialmente, pero que incluye también algunos efectivos trucos disonantes que nos toman de sorpresa.

Todo esto fue el repertorio de “Random Abstract”, una hermosa ofrenda jazz-progresiva con la que el dúo XADU se dispone a estimular el deleite del público preocupado por entender lo que pasa en la vanguardia jazz-rockera europea del momento. Qué bueno es constatar que los genios individuales de Xavi Reija y Dušan Jevtović se han amalgamado en una mente bipartita bien integrada en sí misma.

Gapplegate Guitar and Bass Blog/ XADU, Random Abstract

In the realm of guitar-based fusion, all of course depends on the quality of the improvisations and the freshness of the compositions. We get both with the band XADU and their album Random Abstractions. It showcases the electric guitar excellence of Dusan Jevtovic and the fine drumming of Xavi Reija.

They have two previous albums that were covered on these pages (type in the search box above for the reviews): Dusan with Am I Walking Wrong and Xavi with Dusan and bassist Bernat Hernandez on Resolution. Both albums were very good. As the duet XADU they have moved a step further. This is metal jazz if you like, with compositions that enliven things considerably and excellent musicianship. Dusan reminds ever so slightly of Terje Rypdal in his advanced harmonic- melodic ingenuity. Xavi drums with fervor and imagination, rocking freely with a pulse that is less tied to bar lines than it is additive and subtractive, which frees up the time and gives Dusan a flexibility in phrasing that allows him literally to take off. The tunes are the opposite of formulaic. Dusan’s “New Pop” has a chord progression that stays in your head uniquely. That may be the high point but it all has substance and innovative qualities. This is an album that needs to be heard. Guitarists will have much to hear on this one, but everyone who responds to fusion will find something different and very much directionally ahead.

Highly recommended!

New review in www.jazzarium.pl, Poland by Barnaba Siegel

Xavi Reija “Resolution” – another power-trio, but this time thoroughly modern, slightly referring to the design of noise and above all the creation of analog music, far removed from the crystalline sound equipment. The trio definitely stands out excellent Dusan Jevtovic, perhaps the hope of European jazz-rock. It’s definitely a plate of 2014 to which I return!

Review in Italy http://www.mentelocale.it by Riccardo Storti

A drummer Catalan ( Xavi Reija ) versatile and capable, with proper experience to dare, calling him a guitarist “pollution” of Serbian origin (such Dusan Jevtovic … do you remember one of those who will come on stage with a pedal mileage ?) and a bassist ( Bernat Hernández ) devoted to the spirit of Jaco Pastorius. Inside the House Murada Tarragona, Xavi writes and others weave so that the paternity of the album is threefold. Sure: on the cover of the name stands Reija but this is in effect a trio. Specifically, because of the jazz has the starting structure, the school and the healthy habit of improvisation, but, then, fly elsewhere in the wake of a propulsion oblique.

The key in the title: Resolution ( Moonjune , 2014) or the “resolution”, the mechanism that in music, during the exhibition theme, you can return to the home key, when one has strayed from the indication of the key date score. Well, as underlined in the internal notes, the band “is not afraid to embrace various atmospheres dissonant placed at the service of the music.” If desired, the resolution of Reija Trio moves in reverse: enter a calculated chaos to “fix it” but without abbnadonarlo altogether.

The eloquent and striking confirmation of this practice, it captures perfectly, starting from the bottom (I would say that it is consistent;-)). The last track Welcome to the End, in this sense, has the gift of synthesis and it is almost a rare example of musical cubism: a bass riff on the meter 10/8 (4 + 4 + 2) from which, slowly emerge fragments frippiani guitar overdubs on arpeggios and chords, while the battery search, trial and – deliberately – does not find the irregular rhythms that can deceive to the 4/4, but it is precisely that illusion in which we too convinverci listeners are immersed in a sound universe completely random, and its volatile.

Wrote this, downstream to see sources that can have animated the past vis creative trio … Yes, I feel it, I feel good the Miles Davis of metamorphosis electrical and then electronic. It is in Shadow Dance and in The Land of the Sirenians but in the long Gravity exploratory developments are unpredictable enough to arrive early on the border with almost mists’s noise between postrock and industrial.

If Macroscope feel a genetic parentage from milestone to Weather Report, Dreamer in the general requirements of writing sinks into a funk rumorismo origins bastard (Funkadelic meets John Zorn featuring The Edge?). On the other hand, the opener Flying to Nowhere, connects the base to a be-bop phrasing guitar simply effective (one Jevtovic between Mike Stern and Bill Frisell) with destabilizing crimsoniane openings.

Remaining, however, within the Moonjune Sound, I warned several consonances (that this is the real resolution?) With the work of Michel Delville (Doubt, Machine Mass Trio and The Wrong Object), a bit ‘as if that complex aesthetic sound had taken root elsewhere. I think of tracks like Abyss, Unfinished Love, John’s Song and the title track (the obsessive motus in 6/4 has even something kraut).

In short, this time the ear of Pavkovic has seen far and did well to stop in this fertile breeding ground of Barcelona.

Review by Bill Koops http://blog.musoscribe.com

Leonardo Pavkovic‘s MoonJune label is responsible for a surprisingly high volume of new music, and the label’s quality standard is quite high overall. Here’s yet another. Catalan (Spain) drummer Xavi Reija is nominally the session’s leader, but musical cohorts Bernat Hernandez and guitarists Dusan Jevtovic do plenty of heavy lifting as well. Jazz sensibility applied to thickly chorded rock riffage, engagingly busy basswork and expressive, precise percussion are the hallmarks of this eleven-track instrumental album. Several tracks push the eight-minute mark, taking their time to develop. In turns forceful and contemplative, Resolution is a deeply textured collection of post-rock tunes.

Review in modmove.com by Rod Hudson

In what other world would a drummer’s album be completely void of percussive grandstanding? This isn’t to say Catalan drummer Xavi Reija doesn’t show off some impressive chops, it’s just that pocket groove in the outstanding feature here.

Reija has pared back his band to a power trio format this time out and they live up to that lofty name, not by overstatement but by a process of subtraction. By removing as many superfluous notes as possible, the end effect puts sharper focus on what remains. Atmosphere and ambience are not often terms used to describe the music of such accomplished musicians but it fits here.

There is focus on individual songs but the collective effect of listening to the eleven tracks here is one of an undeniable surrender to the groove. There is a luxurious pallet of sounds at work here, be it the other world tones of guitarist Dusan Jevtovis, the sinuous groove of bassist Bernat Hernandez or the wicked shuffle of Reija, all these sounds conspire to engulf you in a sonic paella of tasty proportions.

Dramatic and resolute in its ability to find a groove in the most out there of circumstances, Resolution is a work that you will want to spin when you have run out of more conventional options.

Review in www.progbrasil.com.br by Renato de Moraes

International trio of Catalan drummer Xavi Reija, which is accompanied by Dusan Jevtovic, guitarist of Serbia, and Bernat Hernandez, Spanish bassist (both play the CD I Am Walking Wrong of Jevtovic). The band actually is a quintet, but for this CD they are in the form of power trio that explores the boundaries between jazz-rock, experimental jazz and Canterbury. The musicians are fantastic, with wide range of styles and rhythms printed by the battery, sometimes heavy, sometimes subtle, Xavi Reija. Dusan Jevtovic sole manner reminiscent mixture of Holdsworth, Frith and Fripp, also using the guitar rhythmically, with beautiful chords, or distorted and heavy sound. Who surprised me very positively was the bassist Bernat Hernandez that mixes a bit of fuzz-bass, with the right sound with wah-wah Bill Laswell and fast sequences with Percy Jones. The sound of the band between Vaira something canterburiano and Massacre / Material, although not as aggressive and more melodic. The trio explores well the experimental subjects, but not get carried away with something very abstract, music is cohesive and full-bodied and surprised by the beautiful melodies interspersed the sonzeira Power trio, going from calm to incendiary with great category.

Issue # 157 reviews | Improvijazzation Nation XADU

The “builds” on this duo’s set of tunes take a bit to develop, but once they arrive, they will catapult you into the nether regions! Xavi Reija does drums and Dusan Jevtovic plays guitar, and tunes like the opener, “Secrets“, you’ll be aware of their intimate construction of music that stays in your brain for the long-term. For something a little closer to the edge, you’ll enjoy “Decaying Sky“… they are still totally tight on the rhythms, but the pace is escalated by an order of ten (or so). If you’re not completely entranced by their music, you’re either not listening very carefully, or your mind is on something else altogether. That’s especially true on tunes like my personal favorite of the nine offered up, “Workplace“… though it’s one of the shorter tracks, it will make you realize that you’re in the presence of musical genius. I give Xavi & Dusan a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, with an “EQ” (energy quotient) rating of 4.98 for this great release.

Music From The Other Side of the Room, XADU

This is a perfect combination between intense rhythm sections, free rein ideas, Avant-Rock, and Post-Jazz Rock. All of the ingredients are well needed for band members in which the realms for a duo from drummer Xavi Reija and guitarist Dusan Jevtovic as they create the concept for a terrifying and eruptive force as Xadu on Random Abstract released on the MoonJune Records label this year. Both Xavi and Dusan worked together along with Bernat Hernandez on Bass on Resolution.

And Dusan though worked with drummer Marko Djordjevic on 2013’s Am I Walking Wrong? Each of those albums are brilliant and for them to work on different projects, it is quite amazing for the duo to collaborate with each other again for 2015 that will make it complex, surreal, mind-boggling, insane, unexpected, and off the wall as Xadu.

Random Abstract is one of the albums that would make you take note on what they will take the listener into unbelievable results with hypnotic brainstorming ideas. Experimental, Math and Doom Metal, Noise, Atmospheric, and Avant-Garde momentum of an increasing volume to show how Xavi and Dusan can take it up a level in their instruments. I can hear the sounds of a resemblance between Robert Wyatt, Radiohead, Guapo, Mogwai, Elephant9 with Reine Fiske, and Krokofant rolling up into one giant hot burrito milkshake that gives it a delicious and spicy taste to get you fired up on what you are about to hear. The rhythm on here are staggering between Xavi’s powder keg drumming and Dusan’s postrock guitar playing with a harder edge sword to it by giving the heavier sound into a throttling roar as if they are going into different parts on the road. Dusan also creates these mysterious and cavernous ambient noises on his instrument to give it a sinister and ominous tone as if something is lurking behind you and having the haywire chaotic effects, makes it terrifying and jump at you out of nowhere.

Xavi also gives Dusan a helping hand on some of the beats and the tempo on the drums that can go from a mellowing beat into a fierce and extreme measure. With crescendos between the bass drum, snare, tom-toms, and the crashing sound of the cymbals, rides, and hi-hat’s, gives it a tidal wave momentum.

Random Abstract is an exploration for both Xavi Reija and Dusan Jevtovic’s free rein. The two of them collaborate very well when you listen to the album from beginning, middle, and end. Leonardo Pavkovic has done a brilliant job bringing more of what is to come for the MoonJune label. I bet there will be more to come between the two of them and if you love Post-Rock, Jazz-Rock, Experimental Avant-Garde music, then Xadu’s Random Abstract is a recommended exploration worth checking out.

Review in www.progbrasil.com.br by Renato de Moraes

International trio of Catalan drummer Xavi Reija, which is accompanied by Dusan Jevtovic, guitarist of Serbia, and Bernat Hernandez, Spanish bassist (both play the CD I Am Walking Wrong of Jevtovic). The band actually is a quintet, but for this CD they are in the form of power trio that explores the boundaries between jazz-rock, experimental jazz and Canterbury. The musicians are fantastic, with wide range of styles and rhythms printed by the battery, sometimes heavy, sometimes subtle, Xavi Reija. Dusan Jevtovic sole manner reminiscent mixture of Holdsworth, Frith and Fripp, also using the guitar rhythmically, with beautiful chords, or distorted and heavy sound. Who surprised me very positively was the bassist Bernat Hernandez that mixes a bit of fuzz-bass, with the right sound with wah-wah Bill Laswell and fast sequences with Percy Jones. The sound of the band between Vaira something canterburiano and Massacre / Material, although not as aggressive and more melodic. The trio explores well the experimental subjects, but not get carried away with something very abstract, music is cohesive and full-bodied and surprised by the beautiful melodies interspersed the sonzeira Power trio, going from calm to incendiary with great category.

Review by Travis Roger in http://travisrogersjr.weebly.com/

“Resolution” is a furious and imaginative display of the disciplined and pulse-pounding rhythms (or polyrhythms) of Xavi Reija and Bernat Henrnandez in counter-play to the exploratory guitar work of Dusan Jevtovic. The creation of space is exhilarating. The sound is not a reduction of notes played but an expansion of what lies between. It is an expanding universe where the number of stars remains the same but that space…

Review by Olav M. Bjornsen in www.progressor.net

Instrumental music residing in the borderlands between jazz and rock with a liberal amount of experimental details, textured guitars with drone-like qualities and what sounds like a fairly improvisational approach is what Xavi Reija along with his musical partners Dusan Jevtovic and Bernat Hernandez provides us with on “Resolution”. While not a production I feel will have a broad appeal, it is a recording well worth investigating if you have a deep affection for music that transcends boundaries and established conceptions, especially if you are fond of music of that kind that has a fairly dark overall mood.

Review in dmme.net by Dmitry M. Epstein

This Berklee graduate made quite a stir when his quintet had started producing well-ordered noise, yet when it came to “Resolution,” Reija’s claim to the global conquest, Xavi decided to throw it all into the nowhere-to-hide format of trio. Roping in his old colleagues, guitarist Dusan Jevtovic and bassist Bernat Hernández, who recently worked on the former’s “Am I Walking Wrong”, the drummer secured telepathic interaction only to give an unhinged edge to the likes of opener “Flying To Nowhere.” There, the serrated axe chops the ever-shifting rhythm with little regard for the tune coming from the surfaces the main man hits, but it’s the bottom-end five-string slalom that zooms in on “Macroscope” to stick a melody in its roaring bowels. Coming from the same place, its beating heart produces a motorik beat within the 10 minutes of “Dreamer,” while the other two instruments rock wildly and with much gusto as they also do for a weird harmonizing in “Pop Song For You” – moving as far from the chart-busting conventionality as it gets.

On the other end of emotional spectrum “The Land Of The Sirenians” rolls out a sweet, dynamically swelling melancholy, and “Shadow Dance” unhurriedly waltzes into fusion. There’s a lot of small details to uncover and enjoy, such as a folky electronic undertow under the title track’s punchy drone or basically all the record’s elements gathered in “Gravity” that emerges close to the end of the album like its long-overdue overture. Still, the finale dawns in “Welcome To The End” wherein the playing does the talking, and though it’s impossible to get its message at the first spin, it somehow prompts a repeating listening. Quite a resolution in every meaning of the word – musical and what not.

Review by Laertis in www.wildthing.gr

The electric trio Katalanou drummer Xavi Reija is the next step after the jazz quintet which maintained. Without keys and wind instruments based anymore – except his own technical superiority and creative imagination the ability of the great Serbian guitarist Dusan Jevtovic with simple but effective melodic phrases, solos and atonal atmospheres (creating amp and pedals) give tonal basis in multi-rythmic structures and fills the gaps, while the funky / fusion electric bassist Bernat Hernández gives muscle” mass and organicity in rhythmic background. The result sounds a bit like experimental film soundtrack with atmospheric shots mixed with scenes of intense action and the trio exudes a sense of sound and music sufficiency. As for our tendency to classify everything somewhere, with this trio of Xavi Reija sound like it has endless possibilities, reserve the right to judge. Fusion, electric jazz, post bop, post rock; Have grooves, have atmospheres have the volume of a rock ‘power trio’. So: post-everything. This is one of the most essential jobs that we have heard recently. – Laertis

Review now by Tim in http://www.got-blogger.com

…”Xavi Reija – Resolution (MoonJune, 2014) Spanish drummer Xavi Reija leads a strong power trio with Dusan Jevtovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez on fretless bass guitar. The music is frequently exciting as the group mines a jazz fusion/prog rock groove that carries them through the LP. “Dreamer” is an extraordinary performance, with the band building to a torrid improvisation with two guitars and drums pummeling the senses. “Unfinished Love” is another powerhouse, even more taut than the first song I mentioned, ripping into the music with abandon, making this an ideal disc for fans of progressive jazz or rock music”…

Review by Frédéric Gerchambeau for http://www.rythmes-croises.org

XADU, ce n’est pas pour la blague ou pour faire bizarre. C’est la première syllabe de Xavi REIJA associée à la première de Dusan JEVTOVIC. Mais il faut dire qui sont ces deux musiciens qui ont fusionné leurs prénoms et à partir de là leurs talents, énormes. Xavi REIJA, excellent batteur devant l’Eternel, a été l’auteur de l’album Resolution sorti en 2014 tandis que Dusan JEVTOVIC, incroyable guitariste de profession, a été l’artisan de l’opus Am i walking wrong ? paru en 2013.

Les galettes ayant été éditées par Moonjune Records, il était normal que XADU soit aussi au catalogue de la même maison de disques. Qui a ajouté là un véritable joyau à sa collection déjà exceptionnelle. Car Xavi REIJA et Dusan JEVTOVIC ensemble, ce n’est pas une simple addition mais une multiplication généreuse des savoir-faire dont le résultat laisse pantois de splendeur.

Il faut dire que les deux musiciens magiciens ont pris leur temps pour concocter leur album commun. En effet, une première session d’enregistrement a lieu le 6 mai 2014 en Catalogne aux studios de la Casa Murada sous la direction du producteur Jesus ROVIRA et une seconde session s’est déroulée le 2 février 2015 à Banyeres Del Penedes, toujours en Catalogne. Le mixage final s’est effectué en mars 2015 à Buenos Aires sous la férule de Juan Pablo ALCARO, un expert en la matière. Il devait bien falloir tout ça pour accoucher des neuf morceaux somptueux qui composent Random Abstract, neuf morceaux tous basés sur l’improvisation et équitablement répartis entre les deux musiciens au niveau de l’écriture, quatre pour JEVTOVIC, quatre pour REIJA et un morceau partagé.

Le résultat varie entre le caressant, avec Secrets, le musclé, avec Random Abstract, l’imposant, avec Something in between, et le bondissant avec Decaying sky. Tout au long de ce magnifique album, Duvan JEVTOVIC n’en finit pas forcer notre admiration avec ses solos titanesques et ses harmonies subtiles. Quant à Xavi REIJA, il en impose magistralement de par sa frappe aussi massive que précise, multistylée et classieuse.

Bref, avec XADU et son Abstract Random, Moonjune Records a encore mis dans le mille.

Review by Holly Moors in moorsmagazine.com

The Catalan drummer Xavi Reija previously worked with a quintet, but he has the keyboard player and saxophonist knocked out and remained a trio. Guitarist and bassist Dusan Jevtovic Bernat Hernandez do with Rija jazzrock who miraculously combines intelligence and subtlety with raw passion and indomitable energy.

“Less is more” is certainly in this case, because a lot of intensive music here you will not hear soon. Exciting, adventurous, with strange dissonances that are perfectly correct, with tempo changes completely in balance and tension only make exciting, interplay and interaction that constantly sit on the cutting edge, balancing between rock and jazz, between atmospheric soundscapes and funky hardrock.

And all the while you sit listening to the virtuoso interplay with open mouth – one moment surprised by the player who does things that you had not thought possible, then you can hear the guitarist with bewildering patterns emerge, and then know the drummer again subtly send.’s number one side Resolution is a great musical adventure. Three brilliant virtuosos especially to convince. Trio as a coherent An absolute must.

Review in grande-rock.com

When the Editor in Chief gave me this CD he asked me to take a look at the cover. I took a glance but I didn’t notice anything. He then told me to look at it upside down. Ha!! All the truth enclosed revealed itself at once! There are only three colors, light blue (the backdrop), white and black. The sea is above and the gravity is negative! So how is all of this stuff connected to the music? First we have to take a look at the track titles, here are some of them: “Flying to Nowhere”, “Dreamer”, “Gravity”, “The Land of the Sirenians”, “Abyss”, “Shadow Dance”, “Macroscope”…
“Resolution” is a totally esoteric album by the gifted drummer Xavi Reija, created with the aid of two other great musicians, Dusan Jeftovic on guitars and Bernat Hernadez on bass. I think that these three guys are friends and know each other very well (just watch their jams at YouTube), so it was very easy to understand Xavi’s vision.
Reija is a true master musician who is able to play anything he wants, but this is also true for the other two guys of the trio. Bernad Hernadez reminded me of Patrick ‘O’ Hearn in old Zappa’s live recordings, and Dusan’s elegant use of volume pedal together with his great ability to create musical landscapes based on beautifully structured chord progressions, create “the three colors” in the album.
I regard this album as an early but honest attempt by Reija to express his own world. Is that easy for a listener to grasp it? Sometimes yes, other times no, but this is totally subjective. So it is unfair even to attempt to rate an album like this one so I give it to you to form your own opinion. After all, this is a matter of taste. But I assure you that if these guys ever perform at my town I would not miss the opportunity to enjoy them live!

Review by Peter Thelen, in expose.org Published 2014-04-10

At the core of this trio is composer and drummer Xavi Reija, just shredding his kit with brutal complex polyrhythms, leaving the listener breathless in its wake. In close range are the heavy funk bass riffing of Bernat Hernandez, and the driving gritty energy of power guitarist Dusan Jevtovic, who’s solo outing Am I Walking Wrong was reviewed on this site late last year. These guys operate in the jazz / funk idiom with full-on rock instrumentation, full of atmospherics, distortion, feedback and dissonance. If one likes ‘clean’ jazz, then this may be a little over the top; let’s not mince words – way over the top. Hernandez’ bass percolations mix it up brilliantly with Reija’s tom-heavy drumming style, often highlighting the beat that isn’t there, keeping the rhythms interesting and far reaching. Snaking through this complex rhythmic space is Jevtovic, adding just the right accents, phrasings and skeletal melodic elements to provide the brisk coloration that gives these eleven tracks life beyond the rhythm section, while remaining wholly subservient to it. While Reija composed most of these instrumental cuts, there are several group compositions interspersed here as well, all together offering some variety of perspective, even softening things up occasionally. More than anything though, Resolution is an intense and muscular bottom-end driven workout from beginning to end.

George B. Harris in www.jazzweeckly.com

Catalan drummer Xavi Reija teams up with Bernat Hernandez/b and Dusan Jevtovic/g for a power trio that changes moods from an ambient/Eno-ish “Abyss” to a Weather Reportish funk on “Macroscope” and Dreamer.” Other pieces such as “John’s Song” and “Shadow Dance” start deceptively simple in the jazz vein, but take you on unexpected turns like a roller coaster ride, making you lean from side to side until the G Forces turn your head back. Wild sounds come at you in all directions on the free spirited “Unfinished Love,” while moody pieces such as the title track get you in a ruminating zone. Creative!

Review by Grego Applegate Edwards in gappllegate.bogspot.com

guitar-bass-drums trio in rock and especially in jazz-rock has become an institution. I remember thinking when Cream announced its trio lineup many years ago, “how can they sustain the music with only three players?” It turns out that it was not only sustainable but also gave considerable freedom and leverage for all three voices.
And so we have had some monumental music that has come out utilizing the trio lineup over the years. I won’t rehearse the names here. Now there’s another trio doing very good things.
It’s the trio fronted by drummer Xavi Reija. Not a household name, you say. True. But if there is one thing I’ve learned as a reviewer this past decade, one should forget initially about the name and go to the music. Then the name will stay with you or not, depending on what you hear. In this case Xavi Reija plus Dusan Jevtovic on guitar (who we’ve heard before in the very cool album “Am I Walking Wrong”) and Bernat Hernandez on bass make a music that make you take note. Their album Resolution (MoonJune 062) says it all in ways that perk up your ears. They’ve learned from the classic Holdsworth edition of Tony Williams Lifetime to create islands of tone that open up the rhythmic feel and give the drummer a concerted role. It works here very differently than with Tony’s group but it works supremely well!
Each player has a pretty well-defined roll in this threesome. Xavi lays down well-conceived and blistering beats that are elaborate, varied and driving. Dusan plays a well-sustained chordal and noteful role that is hip and nearly orchestral in its fullness. The chords are out and unusual and the note choice goes with them in distinct ways. Bernat plays some riffs at times but also plays around, inside and through the riff idea as another melodic voice.
The three make a very heavy yet very sophisticatedly out noise, a joyful noise built on solid group compositional ideas and free interplay.
This is not your typical fusion trio going through the rote licks–quite the contrary. They set up musical pins that have patterns quite their own and knock them down with a relish and zest that gets your psychedelic blood boiling.
This one is a scorcher from start to finish–and more about movement in large blocks than piecemeal blurry-fast scale mongering. Jevtovic has a real sense of space that the other two only bring out the more strikingly.
It’s pretty killer stuff! Hear this or be behind where we are going, part of it anyway!
Grego Applegate Edwards at 6:27 AM

Another great review in jazzandblues.blogspot.com.es

…” Xavi Reija – Resolution (MoonJune, 2014) Spanish drummer Xavi Reija leads a strong power trio with Dusan Jevtovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez on fretless bass guitar. The music is frequently exciting as the group mines a jazz fusion/prog rock groove that carries them through the LP. “Dreamer” is an extraordinary performance, with the band building to a torrid improvisation with two guitars and drums pummeling the senses. “Unfinished Love” is another powerhouse, even more taut than the first song I mentioned, ripping into the music with abandon, making this an ideal disc for fans of progressive jazz or rock music”…

Review in Xymphonia

Xavi Reija’s style is very accessible, but that does not mean that no intrigues his music. His drumming is often quite percussive and sometimes it even seems like you hear two drummers that cater to each other. As with the double trio line-up of King Crimson. Anyhow truly some of the pieces in the most experimental passages that sextet. Other pieces have a bit of post-rock, with particular Jevtovic with his guitar amp distortion mode quite a roaring wall can drop. If Hernández used the opportunity to put down a smooth funky bass beats style hand out more towards jazz rock. The structures are well kept so loose that there is always plenty of room for improvisation and interact. This is typical of the music by biting listener rewards.

Review by Metaltom in grande-rock.com

When the Editor in Chief gave me this CD he asked me to take a look at the cover. I took a glance but I didn’t notice anything. He then told me to look at it upside down. Ha!! All the truth enclosed revealed itself at once! There are only three colors, light blue (the backdrop), white and black. The sea is above and the gravity is negative! So how is all of this stuff connected to the music? First we have to take a look at the track titles, here are some of them: “Flying to Nowhere”, “Dreamer”, “Gravity”, “The Land of the Sirenians”, “Abyss”, “Shadow Dance”, “Macroscope”…“Resolution” is a totally esoteric album by the gifted drummer Xavi Reija, created with the aid of two other great musicians, Dusan Jeftovic on guitars and Bernat Hernadez on bass. I think that these three guys are friends and know each other very well (just watch their jams at YouTube), so it was very easy to understand Xavi’s vision.Reija is a true master musician who is able to play anything he wants, but this is also true for the other two guys of the trio. Bernad Hernadez reminded me of Patrick ‘O’ Hearn in old Zappa’s live recordings, and Dusan’s elegant use of volume pedal together with his great ability to create musical landscapes based on beautifully structured chord progressions, create “the three colors” in the album.I regard this album as an early but honest attempt by Reija to express his own world. Is that easy for a listener to grasp it? Sometimes yes, other times no, but this is totally subjective. So it is unfair even to attempt to rate an album like this one so I give it to you to form your own opinion. After all, this is a matter of taste. But I assure you that if these guys ever perform at my town I would not miss the opportunity to enjoy them live!

Great review this time by Philip Jackson from Schotland, IES…

“Xavi Reija’s ‘Resolution’ is the equivalent of a vinyl double album in length and features the redoubtable Dusan Jevtovic, whose solo album so very much impressed me, on guitar and Bernat Hernandez (from Jevtovic’s band) on bass. This is very much drummer Reija’s band though- he is the main composer and switches expertly from a subtle ‘space between the notes’ approach to an octopoidal adroitness on ‘Flying to Nowhere’ whose melodic theme is based on a 4 note guitar progression- it just goes to show! ‘Macroscope’ has me thinking of the late great Jacob Pastorious in the fluid, supple bass lines as Reija coaxes some incredible sounds from his kit, again with a deceptively simple melodic lead line. Sometimes the music seems to go into abeyance for a minute or so but this adds to the effect as it emerges unexpectedly again from its hiding place. The music really explodes into life on ‘Unfinished Love’ hi-hat and snare sounding crisp and snappy, bass providing the hook to understated, fuzzy rhythm guitar. There is much to enjoy on this album which will reward repeated listenings. Definitely a drummer’s album but much more besides. It’s on Moon June Records”…

Review by Pedro Bekkers in backgroundmagazine.nl

Xavi Reija is another discovery of Moonjune Record’s Leonardo Pavkovic, who seems to have a special sense when it comes to extraordinary musicians. For his latest release; Reija, the Barcelona based drummer, chose to work as a power trio, just concentrating on drums, bass and guitar. So, besides the bandleader himself on drums, fellow Spaniard Bernat Hernandez was asked to fulfill bass duties. On the guitar we find Serbian musician Dusan Jevtovic, who has made Spain his place of residence for the last years. This innovative guitarist also released a solo album on the Moonjune label, called Am I Walking Wrong last year.
Xavi Rejia’s musical style is based on a form of progressive art rock, mixed with free jazz and improvisation. As an extra you get a guitarist who doesn’t feel limited by scales, but purely thinks in sounds. Therefore, this album needs several spins to dig in. Most of the compositions have an adventurous, but solid foundation, laid down by the drums and bass. Using polyrhythmic and percussive drumming, the composition’s basics are quite impressive and the bass can be defined as the instrument that provides the swinging grooves. Over this strong base, Dusan plays his parts; sometimes just a melody that can move on into an effects drenched soundscape like you can hear on Flying To Nowhere. During this composition, you might think something is wrong with the CD or your CD-player, but the guitar has this mean, overdriven sound intentionally. A sample for the fantastic groove that has been laid down, can be heard in Macroscope, a composition that has the same vibe as do Norwegian trumpeter Nils Petter Molvær’s compositions. As a contrast to “free” compositions like Dreamer and Abyss where chaos seems to go hand in hand with innovative brilliancy, is the following composition; The Land Of The Sirenians. This song sticks to patterns as usually used in jazz and fusion. Here the bass gets the attention it deserves and it might end up as the most accessible composition on the album. After this melodic interlude, the guitar and its effects return to the “red zone“ when it comes to recording. Unfinished Love and John’s Song are once more built on impressive rhythms and feedback-filled solos. The title track Resolution as well as Gravity combine the free style of the previous songs with more structured melodies, which means fewer sounds and more accessible patterns…and again, a fabulous bass. The final track Welcome To The End, has a perfect sounding drum groove. Add the fine bass and soundscape guitar to the mix and a wonderful song is born. For a drummer, this might be a good sample for a super beat.
I think Xavi Reija perfectly keeps the chaos in order on this very impressive CD. You have to take your time to let the music do its work, but when the music settles in your brain, I know you will appreciate the project. People who like music in the style of Nils Petter Molvær, King Crimson’s Robert Fripp and like a challenge, please try this one, it’s worth it.
**** Pedro Bekkers (edited by Esther Ladiges)

Review by Grego Applegate Edwards in gappllegate.bogspot.com

guitar-bass-drums trio in rock and especially in jazz-rock has become an institution. I remember thinking when Cream announced its trio lineup many years ago, “how can they sustain the music with only three players?” It turns out that it was not only sustainable but also gave considerable freedom and leverage for all three voices.
And so we have had some monumental music that has come out utilizing the trio lineup over the years. I won’t rehearse the names here. Now there’s another trio doing very good things.
It’s the trio fronted by drummer Xavi Reija. Not a household name, you say. True. But if there is one thing I’ve learned as a reviewer this past decade, one should forget initially about the name and go to the music. Then the name will stay with you or not, depending on what you hear. In this case Xavi Reija plus Dusan Jevtovic on guitar (who we’ve heard before in the very cool album “Am I Walking Wrong”) and Bernat Hernandez on bass make a music that make you take note. Their album Resolution (MoonJune 062) says it all in ways that perk up your ears. They’ve learned from the classic Holdsworth edition of Tony Williams Lifetime to create islands of tone that open up the rhythmic feel and give the drummer a concerted role. It works here very differently than with Tony’s group but it works supremely well!
Each player has a pretty well-defined roll in this threesome. Xavi lays down well-conceived and blistering beats that are elaborate, varied and driving. Dusan plays a well-sustained chordal and noteful role that is hip and nearly orchestral in its fullness. The chords are out and unusual and the note choice goes with them in distinct ways. Bernat plays some riffs at times but also plays around, inside and through the riff idea as another melodic voice.
The three make a very heavy yet very sophisticatedly out noise, a joyful noise built on solid group compositional ideas and free interplay.
This is not your typical fusion trio going through the rote licks–quite the contrary. They set up musical pins that have patterns quite their own and knock them down with a relish and zest that gets your psychedelic blood boiling.
This one is a scorcher from start to finish–and more about movement in large blocks than piecemeal blurry-fast scale mongering. Jevtovic has a real sense of space that the other two only bring out the more strikingly.
It’s pretty killer stuff! Hear this or be behind where we are going, part of it anyway!
Grego Applegate Edwards at 6:27 AM

Review in jazzandblues.blogspot

Xavi Reija – Resolution (MoonJune, 2014) Spanish drummer Xavi Reija leads a strong power trio with Dusan Jevtovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez on fretless bass guitar. The music is frequently exciting as the group mines a jazz fusion/prog rock groove that carries them through the LP. “Dreamer” is an extraordinary performance, with the band building to a torrid improvisation with two guitars and drums pummeling the senses. “Unfinished Love” is another powerhouse, even more taut than the first song I mentioned, ripping into the music with abandon, making this an ideal disc for fans of progressive jazz or rock music.

Good review by jojo de Vries in progopinion.blogspot.com from Holland

…”Xavi Reija has, not least by the impressive guitar playing Jevtovic. a great album. Especially for lovers of other-than-otherwise jazz-rock. It is for me at least an eye-opener for the uncommon combination of jazz-rock, ambient and space rock. A large audience will never achieve this kind of music all that will by no means the intention of this trio”…
Harry ‘JoJo’ de Vries (04-2013)
The Catalan drummer Xavi Reija I knew not. Records Moonjune know yet is still some surprises out of the hat to appear. Reija has surrounded with bassist Bernat Hernandez and I am well known guitarist Dusan Jevtovic, the recently with ‘I Am Walking Wrong? ” that delivered a great album. ProgLog Afterglow tune is already well-deserved attention to.
On ‘Resolution’ we listen to jazz-rock c.q. Fusion. What I particularly welcome, however, the spherical sonic resting points to the jazz-rock bounding a ambientring record. The most succinct illustration of this is the music in the openingstrack ‘Flying Nowhere. This variation would be to make great film music and then at a film where both mystique, romance and aggression also play a role. ‘Macroscope’ let it told the spatial production completely immerses the listener in the experimental gitaarspel of Jevtovic and polyphonic drumritmes of Reija. The game Reija with my ears drumvellen tighter than the ‘normal’ cocked up, I am ao therefore repeatedly recalls Bill Bruford. A great track.
‘Dreamer’ is given in terms of intensity and experiment similar but yet certainly elements of spacerock in itself. The title, however, seems surprising. Dreams at this intensity indeed impossible. Absolute highlight is the title number in which all the above-mentioned praises meet.
Yet what criticism. In “Shadow Dance” lacks the sonic and ambientrandje and degenerate people in endless gefreak, a habit which may be more common in the corner of the jazz-rock. And the CD is taking too long. Nearly eighty minutes to listen to this kind of music is annoying ..
Xavi Reija has not in the least by imposing gitaarspel of Jevtovic. delivered a great album. Especially for the lovers of different-then-else jazz-rock. It is for me anyway an eye-opener because of the infrequent combination of jazz-rock, ambient and spacerock. A large audience will this kind of music, but never will achieve all that in no way the intention of this trio.
Harry ‘JoJo’ Smith (04-2013)

Review in lalunadialfonso.wordpress

Nel capitolo secondo vediamo un modo diverso di approcciare il power trio: ce ne dà occasione l’ascolto di Resolution, firmato dal batterista catalano Xavi Reija, autore di sette degli undici brani che compongono il disco. Qui l’interplay fra i tre musicisti appare decisamente più paritario e disposto all’esplorazione, pur restando in buona parte all’interno di strutture ancorate a solidi stilemi jazz-rock. Il drumming del leader si muove con sapiente disinvoltura in coloriture e controtempi che ricordano a tratti la migliore scuola canterburyana (pensiamo a Pip Pyle e forse ancor più a Bill Bruford), lasciando ampio spazio alle capacità tecniche ed espressive degli altri due lati del triangolo, ovvero il chitarrista Dusan Jevtovic e il sorprendente e propulsivo bassista Bernat Hernandez, già protagonisti di Am I walking wrong?
La partenza nei primi tre brani è davvero impeccabile, poi quasi a voler andar oltre il gruppo prosegue confezionando una materia sonora a tratti torrida, anche correndo il rischio di piccole perdite di controllo nelle fasi più spericolate, ad alto tasso improvvisativo e noisy, come l’episodio ad ampio respiro Dreamer e la successiva Abyss. A seguire è piazzata saggiamente la delicata The Land of the Sirenians, dall’andamento jazz ballad, necessario momento di respiro prima di tornare ad atmosfere più serrate (Unfinished Love, John’s song, dove i timbri delle corde sono distorti fino alle soglie del rumore) fino alla fine, per un minutaggio assai cospicuo ma comunque scorrevole, nonostante le ruvidità disseminate un pò ovunque.
Un ascolto impegnativo e stimolante, un work in progress già valido ma senz’altro perfettibile. La stoffa c’è.

review by jpasinski in JP’s musicblog

Following the success of their first live DVD, “Live At Casa Murada,” Xavi Reija’s jazz-fusion/rock trio are returning with their first studio album in over five years entitled “Resolution.” Xavi’s compositions continue to push the boundaries of music as he breaks down the barriers between jazz and rock right from the beginning with the opener “Flying To Nowhere.” The trio lock into a Rush-like progressive rock groove on “Macroscope” and head straight into the jazz-fusion of “Shadow Dance.” The band takes you on a journey with the ten-minute sound experiment of “Dreamer,” before returning to the more conventional sounds of “Unfinished Love.” Reija, along with Dusan Jetovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez bring out their heaviest rock sound on “John’s Song,” before finishing with the jazziness of “Gravity” and the jammy feel of “Welcome To The End.”

Review in moodmove.com by Rob Hudson

Music like this lives in a commercial free zone and subsequently follows a logic almost completely divorced from financial considerations. In what other world would a drummer’s album be completely void of percussive grandstanding? This isn’t to say Catalan drummer Xavi Reija doesn’t show off some impressive chops, it’s just that pocket groove in the outstanding feature here.

Reija has pared back his band to a power trio format this time out and they live up to that lofty name, not by overstatement but by a process of subtraction. By removing as many superfluous notes as possible, the end effect puts sharper focus on what remains. Atmosphere and ambience are not often terms used to describe the music of such accomplished musicians but it fits here.

There is focus on individual songs but the collective effect of listening to the eleven tracks here is one of an undeniable surrender to the groove. There is a luxurious pallet of sounds at work here, be it the other world tones of guitarist Dusan Jevtovis, the sinuous groove of bassist Bernat Hernandez or the wicked shuffle of Reija, all these sounds conspire to engulf you in a sonic paella of tasty proportions.

Dramatic and resolute in its ability to find a groove in the most out there of circumstances, Resolution is a work that you will want to spin when you have run out of more conventional options.

Review in Valencia, Spain at http://luxatenealibros.blogspot.com.es by Félix Lux Atman

The self and the world recreated in this bright and talented jazz fusion. Published in 2014 by the prestigious American record label MoonJune Records , the album “Resolution” of Catalan Xavi Reija battery has become an innovative and talented musical work dedicated to his father , Josep Reija Gastó ( 1946-2013 ) . An artistic tribute where sensitivity and harmony are present in virtuoso melodic dynamism of each of these issues , as in the extraordinary artistic album design created by Alexandar Popovic where the balance of aesthetics has been perfectly integrated with images photo taken by Roger Conesa Mathioux you decorate for this album. Musically , the magnificent album ” Resolution” is jazz fusion jazz but dynamic , transgressive , elegant and beautiful soul fusion sound which music lovers will romance readers Lux Atenea Webzine musical art lovers and sound genius . Furthermore, if we add to the musical art of Xavi Reija this stunning interpretation of the issues where the instruments seem to have life for the latent and energetic vitality we feel during your hearing, so no doubt is that the album “Resolution “did not fail to impress our readers music lovers. An open and versatile sound fascinating world of jazz fusion , in this case, has a sharpness in its development and in its diffuse a master tempo that causes our admiration as we heard the first track door , unable to stop feeling and to enjoy this pleasure until the end of the last issue when music only able to offer our soul is immersed in the most subtle and heady existential hedonism. Magic and key jazz fusion music to charm music lovers of art in this second decade of the century as splendid as to talent shows Euterpe in the Temple , and Xavi Reija has managed to find the harmony sound is needed that the doors of this shrine open geniuses in its class in the company of other great musicians like Hernandez and Dusan Jevtovic Bernat . “Resolution” , a sublime album and essential listening Epicurean acquisition. Enjoy it !

Review in autopoietican.blogspot.com.es by Cesar Inca Loyola Mendoza

“Resolution” is a beautiful record, above all, a rich hues and textures work in innovative ways pointing to the jazz-progressive experimentation today. XAVI REIJA has excelled with his companions, and that’s always good news for / as music lovers / as.

Review from UK www.acousticmusic.com by Mark S. Tucker

Resolution may be drummer Xavi Reija’s CD, but it was his choice of format and especially of guitarist Dusan Jevtovic which informs us of the breadth of his thinking in what’s basically a stew of spiky, fog-encrusted, ominous, apocalyptic, abstract progrock tone wash paintings. Though the release doesn’t sound like King Crimson, the bulk of it was written by Reija and often reflects the kind of intellectual interzone bridging gaps between Robert Fripp’s multiple conceptions in the old minimalist Starless/Fracture songs, his early soundscape work with Brian Eno, and the fringy jazz-rock of cats like Sonny Sharrock and the late wildman Ronald Shannon Jackson (may flights of hip-cat angels improv him to his rest!).

There are, however, many pools of understated sonics, and these prove to be just as imaginative as the more energetic dust-ups, exercises in what can be done without flurries of notes and ceaseless power chords, Shadow Dance the first explication thusly, a conversation between musicians and listener rather than a fist fight in the back alley or a descent into perdition. It’s also one of the tracks where bassist Bernat Hernandez gets to strut his stuff a bit more clearly in fits and starts, reminding one and all that the bass guitar is just as much a lead instrument when allowed its head. It is, however, Jevtovic’s offbeat brain and fingers which most take command, his many change-ups in texture arresting and hypnotic.

I suggest playing this CD at the upper end of the volume knob, not so that it deafens but instead to allow the atmospherics to take over and transform your living room into an alien environment, ’cause that’s really what’s happening here. Reija is one of those percussionists who artfully captures the difficult personification of skewed realities halfway between clatterous naturalism and pinpoint definition so that Jevtovic’s work floats and squalls just above it, eerie and foreboding. It’s actually Hernandez who most often firmly keeps matters grounded so that his partners can do just that. Listen closely, though. This may be a power trio gig but subtle overdubs and multiple live loopings by Dusan sneak their way in as atmospheres thicken and twist, tendrils rise up and elongate, automatons burrow beneath the ground, and pterodactyls fly down from the clouds to buzz-bomb and harry unsuspecting populaces (Dreamer is a great exposition for all that).

And when you hear what sounds like a fractured recording in Flying to Nowhere (and occasionally elsewhere), starting at 3:30, it isn’t a bad patch cord or a cracked speaker but actually an old fuzz pedal that’s been revivified and is catching on with players like him, Cline, Frusciante, and others. Thus, don’t go jumping at the CD player or worry about your amp. Instead, just sit back and realize it’s actually appropriate to the architecture being erected as you listen. Piranesi would get it, and, knowing that now, you will too.

Review by Peter in yourmusicblog.nl

Xavi Reija is a Spanish drummer that was also present on the Dusan Jevtovic album presented here not so long ago. And wait, bass player Bernat Hernandez was also on that disk. So the same team is the same music? Well, no actually. Maybe because here Xavi himself wrote most of the songs, and on some occasion got help from his partners in crime. And again a release on the Moonjune Records label, who prove themselves very busy!

But for me, the main reason this being a whole other animal, is that this album focuses mainly on drums and groove. And I must say, drums and bass sound terrific here. Very natural but also very big with  Jevtovic´s guitar playing providing additional colours. But that also leads to my main concern with the album. It is certainly rich in ideas, but needs a lot of time invested from the listener. Or you must be big about drums and groove and do not need identifiable structures and melodies to enjoy your daily dose of jazz. That is not to say those are not present. They are just not all too obvious (which is of course coming standard in any jazz environment).

So if you are willing to invest the time, or enjoy fabulous players and a big drum and bass sound, check this out.

Review in seaoftranquility.org by Jon Neudorf

Xavi Reija is a Barcelona borne drummer who has roots in jazz and fusion. A few years ago he got together with Serbian guitarist Dusan Jevtovic, whom I recently became familiar with upon reviewing his latest album Am I Walking Wrong? and bass extraordinaire Bernat Hernández. The new album is titled Resolution and a good one it is.

The music on offer is experimental and decidedly uncommercial as the trio takes the listener into the realm of the unexpected. Music that veers in different directions sometimes feels a little haphazard but not so in this case. Heavy jams of dissonance and rock solid rhythmic grooves are what you will find. The music is hard to pigeonhole, not so much jazz fusion (although there are elements of each) as it is heavier experimental instrumental rock. Reija’s polyrhythmic attack and Hernández’s fluid bass lines are essential ingredients as is Dusan’s dissonant guitar explorations often veering into shred-like territory. No, this isn’t mainstream but the tunes are strangely gripping enabling the listener to be pulled in. Dusan’s guitar work drips with eclecticism often in counterpoint to the rhythm section’s steady attack.

“Flying To Nowhere” starts with clean guitar picking and as the drums and percussion build the guitar work becomes more pronounced. It is a sort of heavy fusion jam rock sound that builds into a shredding cacophony of dissonant sounds made so by Dusan’s experimental guitar pyrotechnics. The soundscape becomes calmer returning to Dusan’s guitar intro, before building up once again. In “Macroscope” the rhythm section leads the way with clear and precise drum/bass work before Dusan’s guitar work resembles a swirling wall of discordant noise. A revved up funk/experimental rock jam would be one way to describe it. Special mention must be made of Hernández’s bass playing, it is exceptional here. The music continues in unexpected directions offering many twists and turns throughout. This is a long album so be prepared to sit down, put on the headphones and get down to some serious listening. Background music this is not.

For those who want to be taken to the precipice where experimentalism and consummate musicianship meet in extended rock/fusion jams, Resolution will be right up your alley. Not for the faint of heart and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Review in lateforthesky.org by Paolo Crazy Carnevale

Progressive jazz dalla Catalogna, passando però per la penisola balcanica. Questo disco lunghissimo, quasi ottanta minuti di contorsioni strumentali venate di elettricità geometrica e divagazioni chitarristiche di ispirazione talvolta post-industriale, tal altra ai confini con l’heavy rock, è sorretto principalmente dallo strumento del titolare, il batterista catalano Xavi Reija, a capo di un trio che si completa con la chitarra di Dusan Jevtovic, di Belgrado, già protagonista di un altro disco in trio per la medesima label, e con il basso elettrico mai scontato di Bernat Hernandez.

Rispetto al disco solista di Jevtovic, questo Resolution è soprattutto un lavoro del batterista – che non per nulla ne è il titolare – che fa dispiego di energia e muscoli per infondere alla musica una dinamica tutta sua. Undici le tracce che compongono il CD, alcune particolarmente lunghe e ricche di sviluppi strumentali in cui i ritmi e le melodie si intrecciano e sfociano in cavalcate ossessive, salvo poi ricondurre il tutto ad atmosfere più miti.

Un disco meno immediato e facile di altri prodotti dalla Moonjune Records, di sicuro interesse per gli amanti del genere, ma privo di certe connotazioni ai limiti della world music che fanno apprezzare maggiormente le altre produzioni della label di New York.

Review in theprogressiveaspect.net by Roger Trenwith

Opening track Flying To Nowhere startsquietly enough, slowly building layers of tension upon Dusan Jevtovic’s simple repetitive guitar figure, until the instrument lets loose shards of the dirtiest fuzzed up snarl imaginable. The drums really introduce themselves on Macroscope, high up in the mix but unfussy, backed by Bernat Hernández’ funky bass line with Dusan growling away in the background. Eventually the drums and bass stop and Dusan gives us another helping of his distortion and feedback in place of a solo as such. Resolved on the back of some dextrous and charging rhythms from Xavi, the tune speeds over the finishing line in the manner of a record-setting middle distance runner; fantastic stuff!

The drums are superbly recorded, it sounds like there were microphones placed just about everywhere; but then, this is a drummer’s album, so one would expect no less. On some tracks the drum kit becomes the lead instrument, a case in point being the joyously careening Unfinished Love. Play this on a decent hi-fi, or through high quality headphones, and it is as if the drummer is sat there right in front of you, his hands and arms dancing around his kit in perfect harmony with other two musicians, creating a forcefully skipping beat.

Improvised and innovative, Dusan coaxes the noise of tortured souls out of his guitar, dissonance and effect-laden howls a-wailing. Xavi stops the cacophony becoming pure whiteout on Dreamer with some nailed-on rhythms as the tune is flung out of orbit. Bernat’s bass then homes in on a Can-like groove with Xavi, the rhythm insistent. This beast will not be denied.

Xavi does not get to dominate all the time, and in any event Dusan and Bernat would not let that happen, being both possessed of strong musical character. A break in the full-on assault comes with The Land Of The Sirenians, a tune in an almost traditional jazz trio mould, but crackling with electricity nonetheless. The lovely tom-tom led tune Unfinished Love follows, for me the album highlight.

Bernat’s funky chops get stretched out with wah wah on the tight but loose John’s Song, and not long after this is the longest excursion on the record, the quite enthralling Gravity. A laid back groove is established by Dusan, the baton is next taken up by Bernat, with the percussion fleet of foot and as light as can be. The three players interlock, fly apart and come together again, but in a restrained manner. Bernat’s bass solo within the tune is a delight, and the whole thing is an exercise in restrained power hanging on Xavi’s repetitive bass drum beat.

My only criticism is that there are instances where maybe a touch of editing would not have gone amiss. I contend that any album over an hour long has to be really special to justify such length. However, in this case it is but a minor gripe, for this remains an album that anyone familiar with Moonjune’s ever growing and highly talented stable of progressive jazz rock trios should fall for big time, as would anyone with a love of exploratory music.

Review in Bulgaria

from http://www.jazzma.hu by Potesz Balázs.
…”The material in general , that are built around a guitar riff and mood -creating a bass drum groove or a groove of the songs , a little Drum & Bass and Rock -inch , most Electro – Swing and bathrobes . Meditative , radiant freedom”…

Review by Peter Cox in yourmusicblog.nl

Xavi Reija is a Spanish drummer that was also present on the Dusan Jevtovic album presented here not so long ago. And wait, bass player Bernat Hernandez was also on that disk. So the same team is the same music? Well, no actually. Maybe because here Xavi himself wrote most of the songs, and on some occasion got help from his partners in crime. And again a release on the Moonjune Records label, who prove themselves very busy!

But for me, the main reason this being a whole other animal, is that this album focuses mainly on drums and groove. And I must say, drums and bass sound terrific here. Very natural but also very big with  Jevtovic´s guitar playing providing additional colours. But that also leads to my main concern with the album. It is certainly rich in ideas, but needs a lot of time invested from the listener. Or you must be big about drums and groove and do not need identifiable structures and melodies to enjoy your daily dose of jazz. That is not to say those are not present. They are just not all too obvious (which is of course coming standard in any jazz environment).

So if you are willing to invest the time, or enjoy fabulous players and a big drum and bass sound, check this out.

Review by Stuart Hamilton in The Rocker/Zeitgeist from Scotland

…”Time for some jazz now, and it’s an album from well regarded percussionist Xavi Reija. If you’ve been keeping up to date with modern jazz rock, you may well recognise his name, but this record sees him leading his own trio in search of his own adventures.

Having said that, a lot of what is on offer is a collaboration with Bernat Hernandez and Dusan Jevtovic on bass and guitar, respectively, and they have an empathy with each other that resonates.

At it’s best, the mix of fusion and jazz rock is quite breathtaking with pieces like ‘Flying To Nowhere’, ‘Macroscope’ and ‘Shadow Dance’ simply breathtaking in their scope and ambition. In places, the music sometimes spills over into noise for the sake of noise, but overall, a worthy investigation”…

Review in www.shakefire.com by AJ García

 I spent the afternoon outside mowing the lawn for two hours listening to Xavi Reija’s latest offering, Resolution. A Jazz Rock album that features Reija’s on drums, Bernat Hernandez on Bass, and Dusan Jevtovic on guitar.
Despite the band only containing three members, the sound on the album is vast with touches of Jazz that will take you places and conjure up a mess of images trapped in your mind until they’ve become a story directed by music and memory.
Just when you’ve reached some sort of epiphany with the abstract style of the music, the trio throw something new at you. For example; the first few songs on the album are pretty straight forward Jazz musings with Reija supplying a steady dose of seemingly sporadic, yet controlled, drumming and Hernandez simply working the bass into complex grooves and Jevtovic giving the tracks an ambiance of feedback or subtle strums on the down low. Just when you’ve settled into this mellow setting the band throws a track like Dreamer at you, a track that had me imagining some future world where man competes with machine for musical supremacy. Jevtovic’s guitar warbles and feedback echoes sound like the death throes of a dying machine against the superiority of Reija’s masterful drum work. Interesting stuff, but because it’s Jazz you’ll see what you see.
Abyss sounded like some Noir style soundtrack guiding an old gumshoe through the seemingly city wastelands of wherever. Danger lurks around every corner, caution is imminent, everyone suspect. I especially dug this track.
Just when you thought you’d heard it all the band blast out in a grunge style rock number like John’s Song. Bass is groovy with a rhythm guiding the drums, guitar free flowing, drums infectiously looping around a particular beat. At some point Jevtovic goes Gregg Gin on guitar bringing me back to the Family Man days and Bass adds on a warble that expands the overall sound of the track.
Resolution is an album that’s going to give you different things every time you hear it. Really depending on your travels. The first time I listened to it within those two hours of mowing it was a pass over. I enjoyed the standards on the album and even more so loved the improvisational aspects that made the album sound more then the usual fare for Jazz. My second time around I was lost in my own mind, allowing the music to guide my thoughts in different directions  and bringing me back to places I hadn’t thought about in awhile. Some music will do that to you. I would definitely suggest checking this out if you’re a Jazz fan, especially a fan of the new school stuff. If you have mileage you’ll get a lot out of this album. If you don’t, what better time then now. Enjoy.

Review in www.distritojazz.com by J.M.P.R.

El baterista catalán Xavi Reija da con ‘Resolution’ un importante salto en su carrera al debutar en una de las disqueras internacionales más inquietas en la actualidad como es Moonjune Records.

Este es el primer disco que aparece a su nombre ya que su debut, ‘Two sides’ (2004) lo firmó con D.X Project y los dos siguientes ‘Dream Land (2006) y ‘Rithual’ (2008) llevaban el nombre de Xavi Reija Electric Quintet.

En su debut internacional Reija se hace acompañar por sus dos colegas musicales de toda la vida; el guitarrista serbio Dusan Jevtovic, con quien ha tocado en todos sus discos y quien también acaba de grabar también para Moonjune; y con el bajista Bernat Hernandez, que salvo en su primer disco ha estado después siempre al lado del baterista. Este trio ya registró en 2010 un dvd que lleva por título ‘Live at Casa Murada’.

‘Resolution’ es puro Xavi Reija, porque hace lo que lleva haciendo durante toda su carrera: un jazz rock contundente, sin miramientos, fuerte y rotundo, atravesado por las justas dosis de free jazz. Esto último es, a mi humilde juicio, algo que resta interés al conjunto del disco, ya que rompe el continuum de los temas, con el consecuente desenchufe del oyente respecto de lo que está escuchando.

Salvo ese ‘pero’, ‘Resolution’ es un disco de una factura muy profesional, muy sólida y que pone de manifiesto que Xavier Reija es uno de los mejores bateristas de jazz catalanes de la actualidad y uno de los pocos que se ha salvado de lo que parece una quema del jazz catalán.

J.M.P.R.

Review in jpsmusicblog.blogspot

Following the success of their first live DVD, “Live At Casa Murada,” Xavi Reija’s jazz-fusion/rock trio are returning with their first studio album in over five years entitled “Resolution.” Xavi’s compositions continue to push the boundaries of music as he breaks down the barriers between jazz and rock right from the beginning with the opener “Flying To Nowhere.” The trio lock into a Rush-like progressive rock groove on “Macroscope” and head straight into the jazz-fusion of “Shadow Dance.” The band takes you on a journey with the ten-minute sound experiment of “Dreamer,” before returning to the more conventional sounds of “Unfinished Love.” Reija, along with Dusan Jetovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez bring out their heaviest rock sound on “John’s Song,” before finishing with the jazziness of “Gravity” and the jammy feel of “Welcome To The End.”

New review by Richard Hawey from Quebec/profil.jimbo.com

The world of Spanish jazz -rock seems to be doing quite well . Rampant Barcelona side effect in some athletes sound experts on guitars , low skilled and uncompromising on the barrel . We had already had the opportunity to sample the talents of guitarist Dusan Jevtovic young Serbian prodigy installed in recent years in Catalonia, on her album ” I Am Walking Wrong? ” It is found in an album called another little master jazz fusion drummer Xavi Reija . Jevtovic had the opportunity to work with bassist Bernat HERNANDEZ , we also find it on the disc Reija . Born in 1972 in Barcelona , Xavi Reija is not only an outstanding drummer, percussionist is also a teacher, loaded with diplomas in the field, a shark studio that operated for dozens of jazz artists , a performer present on the scenes of many festivals . This man hitherto often used began his account with his Xavi Reija Quintet, it transforms by a trio after dismissing his horn section .So we end up facing a condensed structure , focusing on the essential, that is to say, the interaction between guitar, bass and drums , with improvisation as a basic principle. He will not take a long time to realize that these three musketeers glow in the year. Xavi Reija and powerful and fluid game comes to lay the foundations on which the air and muffled bass Bernat HERNANDEZ built the structures through which the guitar will come Jevtovic twirl , sometimes slow and mechanical , sometimes syrupy and sharpened . It rolls out the red carpet for eleven pieces , without singing , exploring the traditional field of jazz -rock while bringing new ideas. The three men usually treat their sound frescoes periods of five minutes, but they sometimes drift to the longer format , leaving their fertile course lead to small monuments technique and feeling ( ” Dreamer ” imagination , “Gravity “, ” Welcome to the end ” ) . Xavi Reija technique is breathtaking : comfortable on all the rhythms , the man also serves us well tempo funk ( ” Macroscope ” ) , tribal ( “Resolution” ) that typically prog ( ” John ‘s song” ) . It is also “John ‘s song” that Bernat HERNANDEZ delivers his major solo, fat and fruity as attacks BOGERT signed Tim or John WETTON . And Jevtovic hovering constantly on these rhythmic clashes , watching the slightest rise to come rushing into the fray and quietly ask his explosives and foggy agreements. There really is something to believe in happiness listening to this cake.I am not an expert in jazz but in recent years I listen on the same lot . Many of those I’ve heard have left me a deep impression , the ” Resolution” is one of those. Why , well the compositions are never exaggerated in the demonstration, but always been terribly technical , cleverly adventurous, this album Xavi Reija and his companions is a delight to the ear.

Review by Stuart Hamilton in The Rocker/Zeitgeist from Scotland

…”Time for some jazz now, and it’s an album from well regarded percussionist Xavi Reija. If you’ve been keeping up to date with modern jazz rock, you may well recognise his name, but this record sees him leading his own trio in search of his own adventures.

Having said that, a lot of what is on offer is a collaboration with Bernat Hernandez and Dusan Jevtovic on bass and guitar, respectively, and they have an empathy with each other that resonates.

At it’s best, the mix of fusion and jazz rock is quite breathtaking with pieces like ‘Flying To Nowhere’, ‘Macroscope’ and ‘Shadow Dance’ simply breathtaking in their scope and ambition. In places, the music sometimes spills over into noise for the sake of noise, but overall, a worthy investigation”…

Review by Monsieur Deliré from France

…”The Moonjune label loves to get international. After establishing a strong channel of communication with Indonesia (Topahti, Dewa Budjana), it is now scouting the Catalan territory for talent. After a CD by guitarist Dusan Jevtonic, here comes drummer Xavi Reija with a strong power trio set featuring Jevtovic and bassist Bernat Hernández. Resolution is more satisfying than Jevtovic’s Am I Walking Wrong?; the music is more personal, more distinctive. It is inhabited by playful, risk-prone writing. And, an interesting quirk, Reija and Hernández form a rhythm section so musical, so melodious, that it allows Jevtovic to dive into abstract, textural guitar playing instead of just stringing solos together. Resolution is a convincing jazz-rock opus with character”…

Review by Svetonio in progarchives.com

…”an amazing progressive fusion album by the drummer from Spain. that great “dark space” atmosphere and interplay beetwen the dummer, the guitarist and the fretless bass guitar player will blown your mind. strongly recommended for the fans of avant-garde, contemporary jazz-rock / fusion. physical CD available
favourite track: Gravity”…

Review by Nikola Savic in Prog Sphere.com

…” A power trio, as one of the jazz fusion’s most common and most efficient set-ups, is by default filled with flawless instrumentation that often raises the intensity and depth of emotion. Xavi Reija on Resolution not only that meets this criteria for a triumphant performance, but multiplies everything mentioned by taking the risk and answering the challenge of exploring. At first, Reija establishes the relationship with Hernandez‘ bass guitar and goes further by tethering with Jevtovic‘s all-over-the-place guitaring.
Reija doesn’t hesitate to visit unpopular music territories with Resolution. He embraces avant-garde and dissonance, and goes far away from anything conventional. For this and other reasons, this album is not to be missed…”

Review from Belgium in www.musicinbelgium.net by François Recquart

Reija, Xavi – Resolution

/ Published on 09-04-2014 /
The world of Catalan jazz-rock is doing quite well. Rampant Barcelona side effect in some athletes sound experts on guitars, low skilled and uncompromising on the barrel. We had already had the opportunity to taste the guitaristic talents Dusan Jevtovic young Serbian prodigy installed in recent years in Catalonia, on his album “Am I walking wrong?”. It is found in an album called another little master jazz fusion drummer Xavi Reija. Jevtovic had the opportunity to work with bassist Bernat Hernandez, we also find it on the disc Reija.

Born in 1972 in Barcelona, Xavi Reija is not only an outstanding drummer, percussionist is also a teacher, loaded with diplomas in the field, a shark studio that operated for dozens of jazz artists, a performer present on the scenes of many festivals. This man hitherto often used began his account with his Xavi Reija Quintet, it transforms by a trio after dismissing his horn section.

So we end up facing a condensed structure, focusing on the essential, that is to say, the interaction between guitar, bass and drums, with improvisation as a basic principle. He will not take a long time to realize that these three musketeers glow in the year. Xavi Reija and powerful and fluid game comes to lay the foundations on which the air and muffled bass Bernat Hernandez built the structures through which the guitar will come Dusan Jevtovic twirl, sometimes slow and mechanical, sometimes syrupy and sharpened.

It rolls out the red carpet for eleven pieces, without singing, exploring the traditional field of jazz-rock while bringing new ideas. The three men usually treat their sound frescoes periods of five minutes, but they sometimes drift to the longer format, leaving their fertile course lead to small monuments technique and feeling (“Dreamer” imagination, “Gravity”, ” Welcome to the end “). Xavi Reija technique is breathtaking: comfortable on all the rhythms, the man also serves us well tempo funk (“Macroscope”), tribal (“Resolution”) that typically prog (“John’s song”). It is also “John’s song” that Bernat Hernandez delivers his major solo, fat and fruity as attacks signed Tim Bogert and John Wetton. And Jevtovic hovering constantly on these rhythmic clashes, watching the slightest rise to come rushing into the fray and quietly ask his explosives and foggy agreements. There really is something to believe in happiness listening to this cake.

Never exaggerated in the demonstration, but always been terribly technical, cleverly adventurous, this album Xavi Reija and his thugs is a delight to the ear, heart and soul.

Review by Xymphonia in Holland

‘… Xavi Reija’s style is very accessible, but that does not mean that no intrigues his music. His drumming is often quite percussive and sometimes it even seems like you hear two drummers that cater to each other. As with the double trio line-up of King Crimson. Anyhow truly some of the pieces in the most experimental passages that sextet. Other pieces have a bit of post-rock, with particular Jevtovic with his guitar amp distortion mode quite a roaring wall can drop. If Hernández used the opportunity to put down a smooth funky bass beats style hand out more towards jazz rock. The structures are well kept so loose that there is always plenty of room for improvisation and interact. This is typical of the music by biting listener rewards…’

Review by Ljubisa Prica in the soundguardian.com‘…

Spanish drummer Xavi Reija a new name on the New York publishing house MoonJune Records. He graduated in 1999. The Barkley College of Music and has since collaborated with musicians of different profiles, with his quintet released solo albums Dream Land (2006) and Ritual (2008) and the current electric trio released DVD Live at Home Murad (2010). Xavijev powerful trio make up with him on drums, great guitar Serbian origin of painting and sculpture, who last year released the critically well received album Am I Wrong Way?, And bassist Bernat Hernández.It is hard to accurately categorize Resolution so that everyone immediately under the label can imagine what that does, but I’m not too wrong if I say that it is a contemporary fusion of minimalist, artistic nature. As such extremely approaching the aesthetics of post-rock, but also opens up a unique world. There’s too much juggling and compliance own divine-musical ego, but also in the forefront of cooperation and functionality with respect to composition.However, this would mean restricting the creative spontaneity and freedom of expression. In fact, Resolution is full of spontaneous improvisation and creativity. In this context, it is difficult to overstate Jevtovićev contribution, whether it is in order to create an atmosphere of distorted, dirty riffs and chords the whole, the work volume pedal and spatial effects or lifting compositions short solos that are so connected with the preceding and following segments that are perfectly merged. Xavi Hernández and thereby the great interaction form a solid foundation that is rarely out of the groove. A groove is generally highly contagious and hypnotic.To the beauty that lies beneath the surface works out to a clearing in all its glory, Resolution undoubtedly require more than one listening. In addition to a glass of good brandy certainly help open the doors of perception. Although dissonant causing discomfort and desire for removal, feature album, this is a very listenable and melodic part of the rich texture and atmosphere, which in itself contains elements of funk, rock, avant-garde noise music and jazz…’

Review by Roger Trenwith on weekendprog.blogspot

‘…Taking the power trio format to some really interesting places, this powerful album expands on the “less is more” theory, occasionally rocks hard, all the while maintaining a sense of adventure that is a joy to behold…’

Review by MARK F. TURNER, Published: April 3, 2014 in Allaboutjazz

Like the classic game Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots where the goal is to literally knock the other opponent’s head off, Catalan drummer/composer Xavi Reija delivers plenty of head-banging good times in his power trio date Resolution. Yet this isn’t your typical fusion-esque recording as it takes some unexpected detours from the progressive-rock idiom with its panache and methodology.
A graduate from Berklee School of Music’s class of 1999 and widespread activity in Barcelona’s eclectic music scene, Reija’s wellspring of experience and chops are evident. True to form, there are thundering rhythms, a pulsating low-end from bassist Bernat Hernandez and scorching riffs provided by Serbian guitarist Dusan Jevtovic. While sonic jams such as the contagious “Unfinished Love” totally rock the house, other pieces are filled with freedom and exploration from the simpatico trio.

“Flying to Nowhere”‘s stress-free presence juxtaposes melodicism and heavy metal as Reija’s multilayered percussion traps fuel atmospheric guitar tones. “Macroscope” is as thrilling as hang-gliding over a mountain with a breathtaking vista. It highlights Hernandez playing an impressive fretless solo with Jaco Pastorius-like ease as Jevtovic silhouettes the theme with ethereal noises in tandem with Reija’s jazzed beats.
The musicians are clearly having a blast as they work creatively through the program’s multi-textured set with elements of ambient-noise in “Dreamer” or gritty avant-punk in “John´s Song.” Whether jamming through undulating changes in the “Abyss” or the artistic changes of “Gravity” and the title track, the trio captures a unique balance of sound, performance and improvisation.

Review by Carol Banks Webber in examiner.com

Entering Xavi Reija’s “Resolution” is like entering someone else’s active dream state. Long regarded in Spain as a master drummer, Reija makes his international debut pushing post-rock avant jazz into the next century in hypnotic waves by virtue of a subconscious deluge.

He called on fellow Catalan and band mate — he’s in Reija’s XRET band — Bernat Hernández, a multiple-genre, fretless bass specialist, and Serbian blues/rock guitarist Dušan Jevtović to help him flesh out this special dream.

Those who’ve heard of Xavi Reija know he’s one to push every boundary in a restless search for moving sounds that bring some form of the human spirit out of the depths, without much of the heavy-handed ritual that can often accompany avant-garde music. He’s achieved much of his life-long objective on previous discs, DX Project’s 2004 “Two Sides,” Xavi Reija Electric Quintet’s 2006 “Dream Land” and 2008 “Ritual,” and Xavi Reija Electric Trio’s 2010 “Live At Home Murada.”

On “Resolution,” recorded June 8-9, 2013 in Tarragona, Spain, and released on Moonjune Records this year, Reija manages to come very close to the perfect avant-jazz soundtrack.

Reija, Jevtović, and Hernández arranged all 11 of Reija’s apocalyptic songs with a deft, light, and intuitive hand. Every musical choice is right on the mark, and the execution — with just these three to pull off mood, motion, and memory — can’t be beat.

The press makes mention of “muscular polyrhythmic grooves of propulsive drumming,” “elegantly played melodic jazz riffing and subtle volume pedalwork,” and “deft guitar loops” for “texture and ambience to the sonic palette.” All that means is, this album succeeds on every level where others fail.

Reija doesn’t purport to be who he’s not, some fancy, rippling jazzman in another masturbatory poetry reading, trying to appropriate Miles Davis by way of Herbie Hancock. Everyone in this business says they try to play what they feel. This guy does it.

Reija’s trio literally does explore every nuance to every song, until the listener is left feeling completely fulfilled, or drained, down to the soul, as if walking that journey side by side with these tireless tradesmen. Through distinct soundscapes that are strictly theirs, the trio crosses the dimensional plane between music and lyrics, to a pure sensory trip. And you won’t mind a bit.

“Flying To Nowhere” eases the listener through that journey of sound effects and deeper purpose, with the slow build of the guitar laden with promise, then — at the 3:30 mark — firing off quirky changes growing more textural, from classical and ambient to rock. “Macroscope’s” funky bass and drumbeats flex an off-center dance number, as if to prove the chops behind the airy intention, with a killer melody tucked in the gnarled-up shred of the guitarist Jevtović and the billowing rolls of bassist Hernández. The machine gunshot landscape of “Abyss” belies much techno fodder threatening to explode, with little hits of the trio’s polyrhythmic blast. “Resolution” resounds with a clockwork of bass rippling through. “Dreamer” uses intensifying repetition to trance-like effect. “Welcome To The End” hammers home the Armageddon feel of this dreamer’s strange adventure.

Xavi Reija’s “Resolution” creates a dream world where every note holds meaning and feels as if it was meant to be a part of the listener’s experience as well. It’s what post-rock avant jazz is supposed to sound like, when done well. Well done.

Review by Felix Marciano, Jazz Magazine (France)

Revelation! Totally undefined genre, trio’s music alternates contemplative atmospheres ethereal sonorities and meticulous overtones, furious odd rhythms with sharp dissonances and unleashed riffs.

Review by JS from jazzmusicarchives

“Resolution” is the latest album from virtuoso jazz fusion drummer Xavi Reija, and it finds him making some big changes in his music. Gone are the keyboards and saxophone, as well as the 70s based classic fusion music he was playing that was reminiscent of early Cobham and mid-70s Weather Report. Instead, Reija presents a stripped down band with just avant-funk fusion bassist Bernat Hernandez and noise centered guitarist Dusan Jevtovic on board. The resultant music moves far from the 70s into something that sounds like three creative guys with jazz skills playing a sort of modern noise dub post math rock thing. Jevtovic is an interesting guitarist, he obviously can play some rapid fusion flavored scales if he wants, as he displays for a bit on “Shadow Dance”, but usually he prefers to work with sounds, textures and spare notes that linger. His simple but effective ringing notes may remind some of Nicky Scopelitis, only with more distortion. Hernandez’s playing on here ranges from nimble funk along the lines of Marcus Miller, to heavy distorted dub lines ala Bill Laswell. Sometimes the three together sound like what Sonic Youth would sound like if they had a really good rhythm section, or possibly the noisier side of the Wetton, Bruford, Fripp gang.For about the first two thirds of this CD the music on here is very strong, modern and creative, but it is a very lengthy CD (equal to a double LP) and towards the end it seems like the music starts to loose some focus and drive. No big deal though, you still get plenty of great cuts. For long time fans of Reija, sure there is a drop-off in “jazz” elements on this one, but on the other hand, its great to hear something that is this new and original. If you are interested in some math/post-rock flavored jams played by guys who have way more creative skills than the type of people who normally play this sort of music, then go grab a copy of “Resolution”.

Review by Petr Slavy from Czech Rep 03/30/2014

Resolution is a varied and dynamic layered disc. Includes rhythmic soundscapes. The game is worked Reija and extravagant at a time, and his compositions have environmental nature of 21st century blues. Four of the eleven songs are the work of everyone involved, or rather common improvisations and have a more fragmented structure priori, but that is absolutely not the case and adds to the charm of spontaneity. They are wild feverish dreams musical sound beliefs with each other together … Exciting excellent listening for interlace.

Review by Zachary Nathanson 03/29/2014

It’s hard to get some recognition in the independent/jazz circuit by establishing yourself to make or record music and needing to find out if you have the presence and what you are doing to get the recognition you need to get out there in the music world. And for Catalan drummer Xavi Reija, he shows a lot of that concept in his mind and captures the boundaries from the realms of Prog and Fusion. That and along with his album, Resolution, featuring guitarist Dusan Jevtovic and bassist Bernat Hernandez (both of them from Dusan’s international debut album from Moonjune, Am I Walking Wrong?), in which it is his international debut from the Moonjune label, shows he a lot of potential and a lot energetic vibes in his sleeves.
What he does on here is to bring his kit through different connections on various moments and he is almost the mathematician going to interesting time signatures to give both Dusan and Bernat the moment when the numbers hit at the right moment and the right time and at times he the conductor helping them get through to point “A” to point “B”. And of course, not to mention five centerpieces to captivate the trio’s hard work on here.
For example on The Land of the Sirenians, it begins with Dusan doing a beautiful tribute on the rhythm section as a ballad of Billie Holiday’s God Bless the Child for an introduction before going into different ambient bluesy yet jazzy background as if you are walking onto the beach by watching the sun going down and enjoying the evening. Then, there’s the hypnotic haywire funky jazz walking effect on Abyss. Here, Bernat is doing this tense stop-and-go walking bass line and Xavi is almost doing this Bill Bruford meets Billy Cobham style on the drums between the snare and the hi-hat and the tom-toms as well as if he’s going through the movements through the crash and ride symbols to get the tense motions set up.
On John’s Song, it is Bernat’s moment to get the engines revved up as he takes on some heavy fuzz and edgier wah-wah futuristic bass. Before Hernandez is going through the various frets and kicking it into high gear, Dusan is going into this Post-Rock workout exercise with a lot of feedback rhythm and lead sections on his guitar by going into different formats from the major and minor chords/solo format and then the ambient noise comes into effect from a spacey feedback ominous touch and the ship getting ready for take-off and then Hernandez comes into the picture and it’s a psyched out funk like no other!
The opener, Flying to Nowhere, is one of the highlights from the album. It has a swinging 4/4 time signature for the first few minutes that at first begins with Dusan doing his Andy Summers and Robert Fripp homage as the up tempo walking bass line and the driven drum patterns come into place before the heavy fuzztone comes into place and then it’s an alternative jazz rock format but more of an atmospheric vibe as well. You could feel the vibration and fierce sensation that the trio, go inside the heart and soul of the music.
The 10-minute piece, Gravity has some very laid-back grooves. It goes through a drum improvisation and a desert landscape guitar layered sound and then the foot-stomping beats in the different sections between bass, guitar, and drums come in for a quick second and then the tempo goes into some changes from a soft and calming beat as Bernat goes into his lovely Pastorius-sque solo to pay tribute to the master of the fusion sound as Dusan and Xavi gives him another chance to be free before the tempo increases in the finale as it reaches a climatic crescendo and bits of early Pink Floyd from the Ummagumma-era of Gilmour’s sliding sound.

 

This is perhaps, recommended listening for the sounds of; Experimental, Jazz, and Avant-Garde rock. And they really created something from the trio to show that they can really do and I imagine Xavi gave both Dusan and Bernat, complete freedom on their instruments and improvise with their virtuosity and I’ll tell you, Resolution, is a wonderful, yet out of this world album that Xavi has unleashed from Moonjune Records.

Review by SVETONIO from www.progarchives.com

An amazing progressive fusion album by the drummer from Spain. that great “dark space” atmosphere and interplay beetwen the dummer, the guitarist and the fretless bass guitar player will blown your mind. strongly recommended for the fans of avant-garde, contemporary jazz-rock / fusion. physical CD availablefavourite track: Gravity

Great review by www.babysue.com from Chattanooga, TN, U.S.A.

Xavi Reija – Resolution (CD, Moonjune, Progressive jazz)
This album just goes to show what can be done with the basics…if you know how to use the basics, that is. Rarely do we see/hear releases from drummers and percussionists, thus this one immediately caught our attention. Xavi Reija is a drummer. And here he is supported by Bernat Hernandez on bass guitar and Dusan Jevtovic on guitar. In an earlier incarnation of the band Reija also incorporated keyboards and saxophone into the sound. The new stripped-down sounds exceedingly groovy and hypnotic. Rhythms are, not surprisingly, the driving force here. All three individuals are so focused on their individual instruments that the overall sound is remarkably thick and full. Hernandez plays bass with confidence…providing the heavy bass lines that drive the music. Jevtovic is a guitarist extraordinaire, going all over the place in terms of styles and sounds. And Reija, of course, provides the driving beat that holds everything together. These guys let loose with some spacey spontaneous stuff here. Very cerebral and mind altering music. Eleven kickass tracks and they’re all keepers. Our favorites include “Flying To Nowhere,” “Dreamer,” “John’s Song,” and “Welcome To The End.” Top pick.

Abstract logix review… 04/01/2014

Trimming down from a more-typical quintet to a trio for his international debut, Catalan master drummer Xavi Reijaʼs Resolution is an extraordinary exploration in dissonance, minimalism, space and texture. Unencumbered by pretense or convention, XaVi has recruited Dusan Jevtovic and bassist Bernat Hernandez [both featured on Dusan’s, Am I Walking Wrong?] for a post-rock/avant-jazz session that challenges the traditional guitar-bass-drums “power trio” format in every conceivable fashion.
Painting with bold strokes which play toyingly against the grain about as often as embracing it, Xavi’s fresh approach — to not only the art of timekeeping, but also the art of music-making — offers an enthralling listening experience.

MIDWEST RECORD blog 3/27/2014

The powerful young jazz/rock drummer strips it down to the classic power trio format this time around without losing a step. Almost intuitively locking into a groove together, this crew picks up the map to uncharted sonic isles that jazz/rock generations past left behind when they reached the end of their journeys. As deeply in the pocket as any genre fan could want, in the right hands, it doesn’t take a lot of hands to deliver a sound full of fury. Check it out.

Nice review by UNITED MUTATIONS blog… 3/27/2014…

‘Leonardo Pavkovic’s MoonJune Records label has just released “Resolution”, Catalan drummer Xavi Reija’s brand-new album.
On “Resolution”, Xavi Reija is aided by Bernat Hernández on bass and by Dusan Jevtovic on guitar.The result is an excellent jazz album.
Polyrhythmic drumming, funky melodic bass lines and impressive guitar soundscapes.
This is right up my alley.’

Review by LEONID AUSKERN from Jazz Quad 3/27/2014

To talk about the style of the album as a whole, it can be argued that Reija and his colleagues have chosen a field that spans the boundaries blurred between the fusion, progressive rock and jazz of vanguard, and talk about the quality of the album – that have plow in the field of glory! The guys at Barcelona clearly bet on the large forms.
The seventy minutes, lasts the disc passed as a heartbeat. See for yourself!

Review by GUT FEELING march 2014

“We at Gut Feeling yearn to bring you our primordial impressions of music, but the fact is that we rarely do so. It often takes us time to absorb music (even in our own superficial way). This release, however, caught us – or rather trapped us – right from the very start of our first listening, when we played the first track and stuck for the rest.On that opening track it is hard to distinguish the groove from the melodic phrases as they assimilate so well one into the other, and once we got lost in that intricate vibe we knew that this trio led by drummer Xavi Reija is something else. The combo (with Dusan Jevtovic on guitar and Bernat Hernandez on bass) repeatedly forms “a zone” throughout this extensive, 77 minute release. This is not a comfort zone, mind you; it is a zone of ultra tight musical conversation, rich with articulation, freedom and understanding, and – on the immediate level – it is a zone of persistent, determined groove. Just sample “Dreamer” – its electronic styled vibe will get you unconsciously dancing on your feet with its drum and bass, enriched with effect-loaded guitar textures, as the instrumental piece evolves through hazy and noisy, free form ranting and mysteries to nearly chaotic scenes (nearly – as the groove is always well maintained and nourished), bordering not only on post rock, but also on industrial metal. Music does not get any hotter than this!”
Gut Feeling

Review by BRENT BLACK / www.criticaljazz.com

Xavi Reija puts the paddles to progressive fusion and jumpstarts the genre to the next level
Moving from a promising quintet to a streamlined trio, Xavi Reija hasn’t lost a step be it in creativity of the ability to bring the listener into the land of rhythm and groove. Joining Xavi we have the funk nasty pulse of bassist Bernat Hernandez and the adventurous and fresh six string pyrotechnics of Dusan Jevtovic. This is a trio that moves from a sophisticated elegance to a full metal assault on the senses with a high octane attack that rivals many of their contemporaries. Resolution is the future of jazz / rock fusion.   The post modern fusion sound is unique with nuanced addition of various effects and loops there is an organic texture created that smolders just below the surface while open ended sound transcends a myriad of potential genre comparisons. Xavi Reija plays the finesse and lyricism of a Billy Cobham and the technical wizardry of a Dave Weckl. Bassist Hernandez embraces the style and broad based skills of a Jimmy Haslip while guitarist Jevtovic is reminiscent of what might happen if Robben Ford and Scott Henderson got into a bar fight. An intense sound yet no notes are wasted as the trio communicate as one harmonic voice of enlightenment with all original compositions. A new artist for some while others are familiar with the 2009 DVD Live At Casa Murada. This is not a typical fusion riff, this is the natural evolution of a genre stuck in neutral for far too long. As artistically gifted as they are technically proficient, Resolution is as tight as you can get and one of the best for 2014!
Brent Black

Review about ‘RESOLUTION’ by DAN BURKE Feb. 2014

“With the release of “Resolution”, Xavi Reija’s trio has delivered the goods first displayed in 2009’s DVD of the Electric Trio (Live at Casa Murada). That release showcased three young and gifted progressive jazz players with impressive credentials and undeniable chops but, more importantly, brimming with fresh ideas. Shedding both keys and sax from the Xavi Reija Quintet format, the Catalan drummer from Barcelona has chosen to construct a leaner sound machine that, through careful sharpening of the remaining weapons in the arsenal, has produced some of the finest post-rock avant jazz out there today. Muscular polyrhythmic grooves of propulsive drumming and Bernat Hernandez’ funk bass riffing lay the solid foundation for innovative guitar phrasings by Dusan Jevtovic which consider the space between the notes as significant as the notes themselves. And the notes? Elegantly played melodic jazz riffing and subtle volume pedalwork may ultimately yield to feedback and dissonance if the track calls for it. But the drum also waltzes. Delicate and thoughtful kit-work with deft guitar loops add texture and ambience to the sonic pallet making this trio feel more akin to a small orchestra scoring for some incredible film. There is an intelligence at work here – a painterly approach that enthusiastically seeks to redefine the sonic possibilities that the trio format can bring to the table.” Dan Burke

Review by PROGSPHERE March 21. 2014(NIKOLA SAVIC)

NYC-based label Moonjune Records have just realesed another gem in the myriad of great realeses coming from their roster. An album by a catalan drummer Xavi Reija entitled Resolution features guitar work of Dusan Jevtovic, and bass lines by Bernat Hernández.

Liner notes by DAN BUERKE Feb. 2014

“In western tonal music, as one note or chord moves away from the sonic instability of dissonance to the more stable form of consonance, we achieve a tonal center and thus have resolution. With Catalan drummer Xavi Reijaʼs so titled release, we find just how much more rewarding a tonal center can be when itʼs author isnʼt afraid to embrace some atmospheric dissonance in the service of the music. Shedding both keys and sax from his earlier quintet format, drummer Xavi has chosen to construct a leaner sound machine – one which eschews modern jazz fusion compositional technique and voicing in favor of a “less is more” palette of tone, density and texture. Through the careful honing of the remaining musical weapons in this trioʼs arsenal, he has produced some of the most adventurous post-rock/avant jazz out there today. Bernat Hernandez, last heard on Dusan Jevtovicʼs excellent Moonjune release “Am I Walking Wrong”, brings his virtuosic bass skills which pair a powerful Jah Wobble dub-inflected groove to the grace and thoughtfulness of a young Miroslav Vitous. As Bernat and Xavi expertly man the polyrhythmic helm, guitarist Dusan Jevtovic is free to follow the path cleared by the groove or venture into less mapped territory. Wielding innovative guitar phrasings, which consider the space between the notes as significant as the notes themselves, his elegantly played melodic jazz riffing and subtle volume pedalwork may ultimately yield to feedback and dissonant suspended notes if the music so demands. Xaviʼs ability to communicate through his kit is something to behold – powerful forearms glide just above the skins and cymbals delivering tribal tom polyrhythms, mathematically precise hat/snare formulas and gorgeous sprays of energy enveloping the entire kit. This is all done, mind you, in the service of the song; every strike, crash, roll, and combination played works to inspire and guide the music into its intended emotive realm. Infectious grooves aside, there is also a welcome economy of notes and beats on display – a musical Haiku – where delicate and thoughtful kit-work folds into deft guitar loops adding texture and ambience into the mix making this trio feel more akin to a small orchestra scoring for some incredible unseen film. A much appreciated intelligence is at work here – an artistic approach that enthusiastically seeks to redefine the sonic possibilities that the trio format can summon. The 11 compositions range from the Enoesque atmospheric terrain of “Abyss”, “Welcome to the End” and title track “Resolution” all the way to the deep streetsmart funk of “Sweetnighter”-era Weather Report as evidenced in such tracks as “Macroscope” and “Dreamer”. These diverse explorations of ambience and groove often occur not just from track to track, but within the individual tracks themselves as in “Johnʼs Song” and “Gravity”. “Shadow Dance”, “Flying to Nowhere” and “The Land of the Sirenians”, which seem at first to be composed in a more straight-ahead jazz vein, are also full of unexpected twists and turns.”
Inner CD liner notes
 Dan Burke